Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

PATRICIA SCOTT SCHROEDER

( 1940-), United States representative

E. CLAIRE JERRY AND MICHAEL SPANGLE

Patricia Scott Schroeder, Democrat from the First District of Colorado, is the senior woman on Capitol Hill, having first been elected in 1972. She is perhaps better known nationally for her exploratory run for the presidency in 1987. A 1988 Gallup Poll identified her as one of the six most respected women in the United States (CPS), and "a recent article in Roll Call, the Congressional newspaper, named her as one of the 20 smartest members of Congress" (F).

Recognized for her commitment and expertise with respect to women's issues, family issues, and matters of national defense, she also has a reputation for her rhetoric. Interviewers have described her style as "personal, spontaneous and direct" (F) and filled with "little witticisms" (API). Andrew Mollison, president of the National Press Club, once introduced Scott Schroeder by highlighting her "well-known talent for phrase-turning" (API). She was presented to the American Business Conference as a speaker with "sharp-edged and wellarticulated views" who would give a "characteristically clear, good-humored, and well-informed presentation" (DB). A self-described "outsider" (M) and political "dinosaur" (API), she is fittingly characterized as a blend of "searing wit [which] can vaporize an opponent" and "shrewd, even lethal political savvy" (F), all of which is based on "an awful lot of grounding in the issues" (PI). This essay surveys the rhetoric of Patricia Scott Schroeder, examining her background and then the rhetoric itself.


BACKGROUND

Patricia Nell Scott was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1940 into a family with a strong tradition of political participation. Her parents discussed politics at the dinner table and believed in teaching their children both the substance of the issues and the techniques for debating them. She remembers being encouraged

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Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Ti-Grace Atkinson 1
  • Emily Greene Balch 25
  • Clare Boothe Luce 40
  • Rachel Louise Carson 72
  • Margaret Chase Smith 90
  • Mary Daly 120
  • Jessie Daniel Ames 134
  • Andrea Dworkin 175
  • Geraldine Ann Ferraro 190
  • Helen Gahagan Douglas (1900-1980), Member of Congress, Defender of Liberal Democratic Principles, Advocate for Women's Equity 207
  • Margaret Higgins Sanger 238
  • Helen Adams Keller (1880-1968), Advocate for the Blind, Socialist, and Feminist 254
  • Aimee Kennedy Semple Mcpherson 273
  • Catharine A. Mackinnon 287
  • Robin Evonne Morgan 306
  • Pauli Murray 319
  • Leonora O'Reilly 331
  • Frances Perkins 345
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman 359
  • Anna Eleanor Roosevelt 379
  • Patricia Scott Schroeder 395
  • Phyllis Stewart Schlafly 409
  • Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer 424
  • Alyce Faye Wattleton 436
  • Ann Willis Richards 452
  • Martha Wright Griffiths 465
  • Index 477
  • About the Contributors 489
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