Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

ANN WILLIS RICHARDS

( 1933-), a voice for political empowerment

BONNIE J. DOW

In 1990 Ann Willis Richards was elected governor of Texas, the nation's third most populous state, and one with a decidedly masculine cultural ethos. The myths that dominate Texan culture are those of rugged individualism and cowboy heroics, and her rise to state and national prominence reflects her success at merging old and new political wisdom to create a place for herself in this tradition. Willis Richards' ability to blend substance with elements of feminism, humor, and folk wisdom in an engaging rhetorical style has been the key to her success in Texas and in national politics. She has become a nationally known figure sought after for her ability to analyze the nation's political condition.

Willis Richards' distinctive approach to politics, enacted in her rhetoric, is a combination of her faith in the power of democratic politics to improve the lives of the disempowered, her reliance on family issues and values as central to political life, and her belief that government exists to serve the people. These core concerns can be traced to her early life experiences as well as to her experiences as a political volunteer and as a wife and mother in the years before she ran for public office.


BACKGROUND

Born Dorothy Ann Willis on September 1, 1933, in Lakeview, a tiny community outside Waco, Texas, she was the only child of hardworking parents from rural farming backgrounds. Her early commitment to civil rights and her rhetorical skills can both be linked to adolescent experiences. When her father was drafted by the Navy in 1942, she and her mother moved to San Diego, California, to be near him. Until that time, she had lived in the strictly segregated world of rural Texas, but in San Diego, she attended school with children of varied ethnicity and background. As she comments in her autobiography, "I was never able to understand racial prejudice after that" ( Richards, 1989:56).

-452-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 491

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.