Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality

By Stephen A. Usher | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The immense vitality and inventiveness of the Greek orators ensured their popularity in their own times, and also the transmission of some, at least, of their work, initially through the stalls of the fourth- and third-century booksellers, and later into the Hellenistic libraries. Interest in them survived the movement of the cultural centre of gravity to Rome, where Greek men of letters, under the enlightened patronage of a philhellenic Roman aristocracy, maintained the literary status of their language and even enhanced it. Of these men, one of the most interesting is Dionysius of Halicarnassus, whose literary circle studied the orators as the prime models for eclectic imitation ('Which characteristics of each should we imitate, and which should we avoid?' ( On the Ancient Orators, 4)). His essays on the individual orators ( Lysias, Isocrates, Isaeus, Dinarchus, and Demosthenes) also contain judgements of literary merit which are purely aesthetic and not directed towards practical utility.

The influence of Dionysius, and of other critics, of whom the greatest was the author of On Sublimity, was strong enough to prevail through the Renaissance and affect the attitudes of nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars. Dionysian opinions provide the first point of reference for many of their discussions, with the consequence that these incorporate not only his strengths but also his weaknesses. These latter include technical vagueness in stylistic criticism, and generalization instead of detailed examination.

Such an examination is attempted in the present book. It includes most of Greek oratory, considering each speech from two main standpoints: as its author's response to the difficulties of the case, which depends on his ability to present the facts favourably, deploy the most persuasive arguments, and display his rhetorical skills; and, more importantly, the degree of adaptation and innovation which he brings to his oratory, bearing in mind the richness of the early tradition that he inherited, the content of which is assembled in the opening chapter. This emphasis on each orator's

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Abbreviations x
  • I - The Early Rhetorical Tradition 1
  • 2 - Antiphon 27
  • Antiphon: Summary 40
  • 3 - Andocides 42
  • Andocides: Summary 52
  • 4 - Lysias 54
  • Isocrates Logographos 118
  • 5 - Isaeus 127
  • Isaeus: Summary 169
  • 6 - Demosthenes Logographos (part I) 171
  • 7 - Demosthenes Logographos (part Ii) 244
  • Demosthenes: Summary 277
  • 8 - Aeschines 279
  • Aeschines: Summary 294
  • 9 - Isocrates Sophistes 296
  • 10 - Lycurgus 324
  • Hyperides 328
  • II - Ceremonial Oratory 349
  • 12 - Conclusion 353
  • Appendix A the Tetralogies: Date and Authorship 355
  • Appendix B 360
  • Select Bibliography 369
  • Index of Speeches 377
  • General Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.