Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality

By Stephen A. Usher | Go to book overview

7
DEMOSTHENES LOGOGRAPHOS
(Part II)

Discussion now turns to the remaining speeches. These are all concerned with private lawsuits, except the De Corona, his masterpiece, which will be treated last. Some sixty speeches and other works are preserved under Demosthenes' name, but critical examination of them over many years, using various means,1 has reduced the number of those accepted as authentic. Dionysius of Halicarnassus ( Dem.13) considered that there were 'not many more than twenty' private speeches in addition to the six he had mentioned. This provides a rough guide to the number of private Demosthenic speeches known and recognized in the Augustan period; and there is the further fact that he accepts as genuine two speeches ( 43 Ag. Macartatus and 48 Ag. Olympiodorus) which modern critics have tended to reject. When these two facts are applied to the modern list of 'authentic' speeches, which is substantially that of Blass, the fourteen titles which it contains must seem conservative, and consequently the seventeen speeches rejected as spurious may seem excessive. In the present early stage of Demosthenic authenticity-studies, my own observations lead me to include in the twenty speeches examined below some which others have rejected2

____________________
1
These include inferences drawn from chronology (the best criterion, where available), the incidence of hiatus ( G. E. Benseler, De Hiatu in Oratoribus Atticis et Historicis Graecis ( Freiburg, 1841)), and assessments of literary worth and technical competence which are, despite their subjectivity, not without value, and should be accepted until scientific examination of objective criteria can be conducted on the whole Corpus (see Ch. 4 n. 4).
2
There remain eight non-Demosthenic speeches, not discussed in this chapter: 46 Ag. Stephanus II, 49 Ag. Timotheus, 50 Ag. Polycles, 52 Ag. Callippus, 53 Ag. Nicostratus, 59 Ag. Neaira, all of which may have been written for his own lawsuits by Apollodorus, son of Pasion (on their authenticity, see Trevett ASP50-76); and 25, 26 Ag. AristogeitonI, II.

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Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Abbreviations x
  • I - The Early Rhetorical Tradition 1
  • 2 - Antiphon 27
  • Antiphon: Summary 40
  • 3 - Andocides 42
  • Andocides: Summary 52
  • 4 - Lysias 54
  • Isocrates Logographos 118
  • 5 - Isaeus 127
  • Isaeus: Summary 169
  • 6 - Demosthenes Logographos (part I) 171
  • 7 - Demosthenes Logographos (part Ii) 244
  • Demosthenes: Summary 277
  • 8 - Aeschines 279
  • Aeschines: Summary 294
  • 9 - Isocrates Sophistes 296
  • 10 - Lycurgus 324
  • Hyperides 328
  • II - Ceremonial Oratory 349
  • 12 - Conclusion 353
  • Appendix A the Tetralogies: Date and Authorship 355
  • Appendix B 360
  • Select Bibliography 369
  • Index of Speeches 377
  • General Index 379
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