Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality

By Stephen A. Usher | Go to book overview

AESCHINES: SUMMARY

Among the recurrent words and phrases used by ancient critics to describe the oratory of Aeschines, the most individually descriptive emphasize its elevation and grandiloquence.37 Qualities of voice and delivery appear to take precedence over the purely rhetorical and literary aspects of his oratory in much of this criticism,38 but in that of Philostratus ( Lives of the Sophists 18. 509), reference to his 'divinely-inspired manner in oratory',39 however derivative it may be,40 is peculiarly applicable to Aeschines' speeches. This manner is seen in his efforts, notably in Against Timarchus, to create a general atmosphere of dignity and decorum by dwelling on august individuals and institutions, praising the laws and expressing lofty sentiments. He reminds the jury of the divinity of Pheme (Report, Popular Opinion), the agency he wants them to accept instead of rigorously examined evidence (128), and calls to his aid the poets of epic and tragedy along with appeals to higher feelings.41

His contribution to the narrative tradition of Greek oratory may arise from the circumstances in which he found himself. Always dealing with personal enemies, when he comes to describe their actions there is an extra element of acerbity, present in both the shorter narratives,42 and sustained in some longer accounts,43 in

____________________
37
Demosthenes himself begins this tradition ( 19 Leg.255; 18 Cor.133), though his use of the words σεμνολογει + ̑ν, σεμνολόγος was ironic or critical.
38
This is seen, for example, in Cicero's choice ( De Or. 3. 28) of sonitum ('sonority') as Aeschines' peculiar attribute. Again, Dion. Hal. highlights his natural gifts ( Dem.35: ).
39
.Cf. Quint. 12. 10. 23: latior et audentior et excelsior.
40
See [ Longinus] Subl. 13. 2, and D. A. Russell, Longinus On the Sublime ( Oxford, 1964), 114-15.
41
There is no good reason to believe Aeschines' procatalepsis in § 133, where he says he expects Timarchus to quote from Homer: that would have been quixotic against an opponent with Aeschines' theatrical background.
42
In Leg.34, Aeschines describes how, as his ambassadorial colleagues awaited Demosthenes' promised tour de force, 'this abject creature (τὸ θηρίον του + ̑το) uttered a ghost of a prooemium, mortified with fright', and after a short while dried up and stood in helpless silence. Elsewhere, he likes to draw attention to his enemy's mannerisms (36, 49) and to quote his words in order to expose his malice and inconsistency (54: . . . ).
43
e.g. Ag. Ctes.71-105: Demosthenes 'seizes the platform' (71), 'forces the decision' (72); then there is his 'fawning' (κολακεία . . . 77 κόλαξ) on Philip's envoys (76); he is 'the accursed fellow who stands forth as accuser of the rest' (79), and in the ensuing confusion, he 'followed his own inborn corruption, along with his cowardice and jealousy of Philocrates' bribes' (81).

-294-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greek Oratory: Tradition and Originality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Abbreviations x
  • I - The Early Rhetorical Tradition 1
  • 2 - Antiphon 27
  • Antiphon: Summary 40
  • 3 - Andocides 42
  • Andocides: Summary 52
  • 4 - Lysias 54
  • Isocrates Logographos 118
  • 5 - Isaeus 127
  • Isaeus: Summary 169
  • 6 - Demosthenes Logographos (part I) 171
  • 7 - Demosthenes Logographos (part Ii) 244
  • Demosthenes: Summary 277
  • 8 - Aeschines 279
  • Aeschines: Summary 294
  • 9 - Isocrates Sophistes 296
  • 10 - Lycurgus 324
  • Hyperides 328
  • II - Ceremonial Oratory 349
  • 12 - Conclusion 353
  • Appendix A the Tetralogies: Date and Authorship 355
  • Appendix B 360
  • Select Bibliography 369
  • Index of Speeches 377
  • General Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.