Haydn, Mozart, & Beethoven: Studies in the Music of the Classical Period

By Sieghard Brandenburg | Go to book overview

3
A New Manuscript from Clementi's Early Years as a Keyboard Virtuoso

OLIVER NEIGHBOUR

Clementi's sudden rise to fame at the end of the 1770s is not well documented. The early accounts, relying on information supplied by the composer forty years or more later, are misleading. However, it now seems clear that for some time after his move to London in 1773 or 1774 from the Dorset seat of his patron Peter Beckford, Clementi made little headway as a solo harpsichordist. So far as can be told from newspaper announcements his performances of a concerto and a sonata of his own composition in public concerts in 1775 remained isolated events. It was only after the publication of his Op. 2 sonatas in the spring of 1779 that his success was assured. By that time he had developed formidable technical powers, particularly in the execution of passages in octaves, thirds, and sixths, and he advertised his prowess in the three solo sonatas of the set, Nos. 2, 4, and 6. The fame of these works apparently spread quickly to the Continent; at all events he soon felt emboldened to try his fortune there. In the summer of 1780 he set out for Paris.1

For a man of 28 his published output was small, consisting merely of his Opp. 1-4 and the 'Black Joke' variations. All are keyboard works, but since some employ accompanying instruments he could draw for his solo recitals only on the six early, small-scale sonatas issued in 1771 as his Op. 1, the variations, and the three sonatas from Op. 2. Moreover, in the event Op. 1 apparently proved unsuited to French taste, and he published a new though scarcely more ambitious version of it in Paris, using only bits and

____________________
1
For details of Clementi's life and works the present article is heavily indebted to Alan Tyson, Thematic Catalogue of the Works of Muzio Clementi (Tutzing, 1967), and Leon Plantinga, Clementi: His Life and Music ( London, 1977).

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Haydn, Mozart, & Beethoven: Studies in the Music of the Classical Period
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.