A History of Scottish Women's Writing

By Douglas Gifford; Dorothy McMillan | Go to book overview

A History of Scottish Women's Writing

Edited by Douglas Gifford and Dorothy McMillan

Edinburgh University Press

-iii-

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A History of Scottish Women's Writing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: A History of Scottish Women's Writing ix
  • Notes xxii
  • 1: The Gaelic Tradition Up to 1750 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2: Scottish Women Writers C.1560-C.1650 15
  • Notes 39
  • 3: Old Singing Women and the Canons of Scottish Balladry and Song 44
  • Notes 56
  • 4: Women and Song 1750-1850 58
  • Notes 67
  • 5: Selves and Others: Non-Fiction Writing in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries 71
  • Notes 88
  • 6: Burns's Sister 91
  • Notes 101
  • 7: 'Kept Some Steps Behind Him': Women in Scotland 1780-1920 103
  • Notes 117
  • 8: Some Early Travellers 119
  • Notes 140
  • 9: From Here to Alterity: The Geography of Femininity in the Poetry of Joanna Baillie 143
  • Notes 155
  • 10: Some Women of the Nineteenth-Century Scottish Theatre: Joanna Baillie, Frances Wright and Helen Macgregor 158
  • Notes 175
  • 11: The Other Great Unknowns. Women Fiction Writers of the Early Nineteenth Century 179
  • Notes 193
  • 12: Rediscovering Scottish Women's Fiction in the Nineteenth Century 196
  • 13: Elizabeth Grant 208
  • Notes 215
  • 14: Viragos of the Periodical Press: Constance Gordon-Cumming) Charlotte Dempster, Margaret Oliphant, Christian Isobel Johnstone 216
  • Notes 228
  • 15: Jane Welsh Carlyle's Private Writing Career 232
  • Notes 243
  • 16: Beyond 'The Empire of the Gentle Heart': Scottish Women Poets of the Nineteenth Century 246
  • Notes 259
  • 17: What A Voice! Women, Repertoire and Loss in the Singing Tradition 262
  • Notes 272
  • 18: Margaret Oliphant 274
  • Notes 289
  • 19: Caught Between Worlds: The Fiction of Jane and Mary Findlater 291
  • Notes 307
  • 20: Scottish Women Writers Abroad: The Canadian Experience 309
  • Notes 314
  • 21: Women and Nation 316
  • Notes 326
  • 22: Annie S. Swan and O. Douglas: Legacies of the Kailyard 329
  • Notes 345
  • 23: Tales of Her Own Countries: Violet Jacob 347
  • Notes 357
  • 24: Fictions of Development 1920-1970 360
  • Notes 371
  • 25: Marion Angus and the Boundaries of Self 373
  • Notes 387
  • 26: Catherine Carswell: Open the Door! 389
  • Notes 398
  • 27: Willa Muir: Crossing the Genres 400
  • Notes 414
  • 28: 'To Know Being': Substance and Spirit in the Work of Nan Shepherd 416
  • Notes 426
  • 29: Twentieth-Century Poetry I: Rachel Annand Taylor to Veronica Forrest-Thomson 428
  • Notes 442
  • 30: More Than Merely Ourselves: Naomi Mitchison 444
  • Notes 454
  • 31: The Modern Historical Tradition 456
  • Notes 466
  • 32: Jane Duncan: The Homecoming of Imagination 468
  • Notes 480
  • 33: Jessie Kesson 481
  • Notes 492
  • 34: Scottish Women Dramatists Since 1945 494
  • Notes 512
  • 35: The Remarkable Fictions of Muriel Spark 514
  • Notes 524
  • 36: Vision and Space in Elspeth Davie's Fiction 526
  • Notes 536
  • 37: Designer Kailyard 537
  • Notes 547
  • 38: Twentieth-Century Poetry Ii: The Last Twenty-Five Years 549
  • Notes 577
  • 39: Contemporary Fiction I: Tradition and Continuity 579
  • Notes 603
  • 40: Contemporary Fiction Ii: Seven Writers in Scotland 604
  • Notes 629
  • 41: Contemporary Fiction III: The Anglo-Scots 630
  • Notes 640
  • 42: The Mirror and the Vamp: Liz Lochhead 641
  • Notes 657
  • 43: Women's Writing in Scottish Gaelic Since 1750 659
  • Conclusion 675
  • Note 676
  • Select Bibliographies of Scottish Women Writers 677
  • Notes on Contributors 708
  • Index 710
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