Origins of Art: A Psychological & Sociological Inquiry

By Yrjö J. Hirn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
CONCLUSIONS

THERE are several aspects of the history of art which have had to be ignored in the preceding chapters. A student of ethnology, for instance, will blame us because in our hasty review of primitive art no mention has been made of the important influence which political institutions and religious systems have exercised on the development of art. Nor can there be any question of denying that these factors ought to be properly treated of in every research which aims at a descriptive completeness. From the historical point of view indeed nothing could be more interesting than to pursue throughout the general history of art that line of investigation which Mr. Posnett has applied to the study of literature. Not only in the lower stages of culture, but also among civilised nations, one might show how in all its forms and branches art has been. influenced for good and bad by the progress of political development. Tribal drama, tribal sculpture, and tribal poetry might thus be instructively contrasted with the art of commonwealths and monarchic states. Still wider results might be attained by tracing those differences in types of art which arise from differences in the religious systems. But such researches, however

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Origins of Art: A Psychological & Sociological Inquiry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I the Problem Stated 1
  • Chapter II the Art-Impulse 18
  • Chapter III the Feeling-Tone of Sensation 30
  • Chapter IV the Emotions 43
  • Chapter V the Enjoyment of Pain 56
  • Chapter VI Social Expressioin 72
  • Chapter VII 86
  • Chapter VIII Art the Reliever 102
  • Chapter IX the Work of Art 111
  • Chapter X Objections and Answers 134
  • Chapter XI the Concrete Origins of Art 143
  • Chapter XII Art and Information 149
  • Chapter XIII Historical Art 164
  • Chapter XIV Animal Display 186
  • Chapter XV Art and Sexual Selection 203
  • Chapter XVI the Origins of Self-Decoration 214
  • Chapter XVII Erotic Art 228
  • Chapter XVIII Art and Work 249
  • Chapter XIX 261
  • Chapter XX Art and Magic 278
  • Chapter XXI Conclusions 298
  • Authorities Quoted 307
  • Index of Authors 323
  • Index of Subjects 328
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