The Imagination of Disaster: Evil in the Fiction of Henry James

By J. A. Ward | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In the course of writing and rewriting this book, I have received much valuable assistance and advice. I especially wish to acknowledge the wisdom, generosity, and patience of Professor Richard Harter Fogle of Tulane University, who first encouraged me to deal with the subject, guided my work to completion in its first form as a doctoral dissertation, and carefully read the revised version I prepared for publication. Professors Richard P. Adams, John D. Husband, and George W. Meyer of Tulane, Professor Richard T. Wagner of the University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Professor B. R. McElderry, Jr. of the University of Southern California have also read the manuscript in entirety; to each of these I am very grateful. The notes suggest the extent of my indebtedness to all the critics and scholars whose work has helped my understanding of James.

I also wish to thank the editors and directors of the following journals and presses for permission to reprint portions of this study which first appeared in article form: Twentieth Century Literature for "Henry James and the Nature of Evil", slightly enlarged as Chapter One; Mississippi Quarterly for "Henry James's America: Versions of Oppression", slightly altered as part one of Chapter Two; Texas Studies in Literature and Language for "The Ineffectual Heroes of James's Middle Period", slightly enlarged as part one of Chapter Three; Arizona Quarterly for "Social Criticism in James's London Fiction", slightly altered as part two of Chapter Three; The Regents of the University of California and the University of California Press, publishers of Nineteenth-Century Fiction, for "The Ambassadors: Strether's Vision of Evil", © 1959 by The Regents, slightly enlarged as part one of Chapter Three; the Wayne State University Press, publishers of Criticism, for "Social Disintegration in The Wings of the Dove", copyright 1960 by Wayne State University Press, slightly enlarged as part two of Chapter Four; and the Western Humanities Review for "Evil in The Golden Bowl", slightly altered as part three of Chapter Four.

I am indebted to the following publishers for permission to quote from materials on which they hold copyright: to the American Book Company, for a quotation from the introduction to Henry James: Representative Selections, by Lyon N. Richardson; to E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., publishers of The Pilgrimage of Henry James, by Van Wyck Brooks ; to George W. Stewart, publisher of The Great Tradition by F. R. Leavis; to Grove Press, Inc., for permission to

-ix-

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The Imagination of Disaster: Evil in the Fiction of Henry James
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter One - the Consciousness of Evil 3
  • Chapter Two - Evil and the International Theme 18
  • Chapter Three - Evil in London 56
  • Chapter Four - Evil and the Major Phase 102
  • Chapter Five - the Last Tales: the Appalled Appalling 157
  • Conclusion 168
  • Notes 172
  • Index 183
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