Dag Hammarskjold, Custodian of the Brushfire Peace

By Joseph P. Lash | Go to book overview

3
The Swedish Heritage ". . . the private man should disappear."

In Stockholm's Old City, where the cobbled streets are carriage width and houses and taverns date back to the time when the history of Sweden was also the history of Europe, the Swedish Academy has its lodgings in an eighteenth-century palace. Here the Eighteen gather for their weekly discussions, retiring afterwards to Den Gyldene Freden for supper. The hostelry's name commemorates "the golden peace" that settled on the land after Sweden's career as a great power came to an end following the defeats suffered by Charles XII.

In the Academy's palace takes place also the annual meeting where, with the royal family and government in attendance and the Eighteen seated in the blue and golden armchairs which date back to the Academy's founding, the Nobel prize for literature is awarded.

It is December 20, 1954. Dag Hammarskjold is in Stockholm to confer with the Chinese Ambassador about his coming trip

-16-

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Dag Hammarskjold, Custodian of the Brushfire Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Custodian of the Brushfire Peace 1
  • 2 - Dag Hammarskjold -- Who is He? 7
  • 3 - The Swedish Heritage . . . the Private Man Should Disappear."" 16
  • 4 - An International Priesthood 46
  • 5 - Mission to Peking 56
  • 6 - Holding the Line in the Middle East 66
  • 7 - Back from the Brink 80
  • 8 - The Steep Hill of Suez 94
  • 9 - Arab Good Neighbors"" 112
  • 10 - Constantly Rebuffed but Never Discouraged"" 128
  • 11 - Preventive Diplomacy 137
  • 12 - The UN and the Cold War 147
  • 13 - The UN as a Third Force 164
  • 14 - A UN Presence 177
  • 15 - Vox Populorum 189
  • 16 - The Sources of His Power"" 203
  • 17 - The Private Man 213
  • 18 - The Congo-- Precedent or Fiasco? 223
  • 19 - Chairman Khrushchev Pounds the Desk 263
  • 20 - One-Man Job 281
  • Epilogue 293
  • Index 298
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