WHY THIS BOOK

Now on the verge of war, the way lies straight ahead, but it may help to recall something of the road we have come over. Even on the rim of hell I shall want to know how I got there. The rapid tide of events has confused most of us and dulled the sharpness of first impressions. It's understanding, not confusion, that contributes to morale.

This volume is little more than a scrapbook, a selection from voluminous files of clippings and comments on events domestic and international, and notes on articles and books of the past few years. This contemporary running summary, with later notes bringing the topics up to date, and introductory chapters which endeavor to give in narrative form something of the background, may prove clarifying. The 100 Bulletins which form the core of the book must at times show the heats and fevers of the day, but may have as much value because of this as the more careful accounts which will be the aftermath of the present excitement.


TO MEET A DEMAND

The Bulletins, sent out approximately weekly, were widely distributed, first to private school and college people on my regular mailing list, and later only to those who asked for them or were recommended. The flood of letters that came in response showed how seldom recognized were British propaganda methods even by supposedly well-informed Americans. So I felt obliged to continue to supply so far as I was able this demand for suppressed information.

The making of this book has been the part-time avocation of a man past the university retirement age, who finds twenty-four hours a day, seven days in a week, too brief a time to carry on his regular work of publishing, maintaining an advisory service for schools, and helping to solve the educational problems of over a thousand families yearly. The reading and the research have been done chiefly when honest men were in bed and others in night clubs. The compilation was dictated in snatches in intervals of a busy day, fitted to the limits of a stencil and mailed out still moist.

This was not my job though it is true that each year I have made it my business to bring to the attention of discriminating parents and readers, as well as to educators, current matters that seemed of importance to the future of their children and the country. And in my privileged and detached position of what for a quarter of a century I have described on

-11-

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