During the fall of 1940, Patiño spent much time in New York and Washington. There was much activity and rumor of American smelters being established. December 9, Paul Mallon reported from Washington, "Construction of a tin smelter has been held up by a row over what kind of a smelter it is to be. The Jones group in RFC wants a small and cheap one. The War Department has been trying for two months to get a synthetic rubber project started, involving construction of 10 plants. Their plaint is that the price could be reduced within reason by such large scale operations and the plants could be built in a year and a half. The project has been held up in RFC." Just how the British tin monopolists control our State Department in such matters, it would be interesting to know. (cf Bul #95 re: embargo on scrap iron to Japan) (The RFC has plenty of money,--if it isn't inimical to British interests.)
(13)
Some idea of the billions that it has cost the American people to support the British Empire, of the wealth that has been taken out of America to maintain the British way of life among the upper classes, (and do they know how to live! thanks to India) of the contributions we have made to restore and reconstruct the devastations caused by the failure of their diplomats, may be learned by consulting Leigh "Conscript Europe" and Cless' "11th Commandment".

BRITISH PROPAGANDA 1939

" Britain Woos America", the latest timely Bulletin, June 10, 1939, of the Institute for Propaganda Analysis, reviews Captain Rogerson "Propaganda in the Next War" at some length. "The British would probably like the United States to repeal the Johnson Act, to amend--if not repeal--the Neutrality Act.(1) Britain would like to borrow from us and to buy munitions from us, and it can do neither if those acts remain in force."

Duff Cooper, Herald Tribune, May 17, claims the royal visit was due to fatigue,(2) for rest and recreation, not propaganda. The Institute points to the connection of Munich, rearmament, and the royal visit. "When they came, propaganda came with them. Nor will it leave when they do."

H. L. Mencken, in the Baltimore Sun, in an editorial on "The Third Term Campaign,"--"Their Britannic Majesties . . . did not come unaccompanied, but brought along a formidable entourage of high-pressure lovers of humanity, and others were already at work in Washington. While King George suffocated in his heavy English underwear . . . there were plenty of confidential conferences out in the garage . . . all based on the theory that when, as and if the war comes at last, the United States will do its duty. . . .

-113-

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