NOTES
(1)
There was some reason for this complaint. Senator Holt told the Senate that the N. Y. Herald Tribune, Oct. 6, 1938, reported that "the Outer Bridge speech of the President of the United States, about quarantining nations and engaging in war, was given to the British Foreign Office before he delivered the address". This subservience to the British was matched only by the contempt toward the Germans. On the occasion of the Hitler speech, Sept. 1939, which Roosevelt dodged comment on by saying he had not heard it all nor read it, a Washington correspondent reported, "In general the attitude among officials here toward it was one of reserve. They wanted opportunity to study the complete text and to await what Prime Minister Chamberlain will say to the House of Commons tomorrow before attempting to estimate possibilities." ( Boston Herald, Sept. 20, 1939)
(2)
"The Roosevelts tactfully made the most of this opportunity to cement the bonds of Anglo-American amity and erase whatever unfavorable memories lingered from l'affaire Simpson--and from Munich. Their reception of their royal guests was carefully arranged to be both dignified and heartily American, with more than a touch of the military. . . . Ten 'flying fortress' bombing planes roared over the route of the procession to the White House, and the cars in which rode the King and the President, and the Queen and Mrs. Roosevelt, were preceded by sixty businesslike-looking baby tanks. . . . At Hyde Park . . . they consumed hot dogs and beer. (The King could have dodged the hot dogs . . . but he knew well that a hot dog eaten smilingly in America might we worth a dozen battleships) . . . . A few weeks after this success, the President tried hard to get Congress to rewrite the Neutrality Act and do away with the mandatory ban on the export of arms and munitions to warring countries. Not yet, however, was Congress ready to take this leap", writes Frederick Lewis Allen in "Since Yesterday" (pp 341-343).
(3)
International Affairs since the war has been published at Balliol College, Oxford. The article by Lord Lothian referred to was delivered as an address at Chatham House, March 14, 1939, and is perhaps the last signed article published by him as a free speaking Englishman before it became his duty as ambassador to bring us into the war. Referring to Quincy Howe "England Expects Every American to do His Duty", he says, "That is just about the attitude of every Englishman. Yet the Americans know quite well that when we urge the United States to do the world's work, she will, if she accepts our advice, be picking our British chestnuts for us out of the international fire."

Lothian who had recently returned from America said, "Of the President himself there is no doubt whatever where his own sympathies lie. . . . In addition to that he is, I think, a good diplomatic poker player". President Roosevelt believes that "to prevent the war happening . . . it is in American interests, as well as in the interests of democracy, to assist France and Great Britain to buy in the United States all the armaments they need in order to strengthen their own defences, because the stronger France and England are, the less likely is war in

-125-

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