itself, and, if war comes, the smaller will be the contribution which it will be necessary for the United States itself to make if it wants the democracies to win. There is now a proposal before the Congress to amend the Neutrality Act."

Lord Lothian as Rhodes Scholarship trustee had visited the United States sixteen times since the last war and more recently had been promoting "'Union Now'", Streit's book, before it was printed in America. In his speech he refers to this project so dear to Cecil Rhodes. He declares, "I am a cautious optimist about the future, though there may be future changes and shocks before we get back to the bedrock of the democratic cooperation for which the new world system must be built."

In the same issue, Lionel Curtis in his address on "World Order" said that while he was in New York in January, 1939, "Mr. Clarence Streit of the New York Times called to see me. He had been on President Woodrow Wilson's staff at Paris and had for years represented the New York Times at Geneva. In watching the League at work he had seen how unstable a system based on compacts between sovereign States must be. He had then discovered and read "The Federalist", which had shown him why this must be so. . . . Mr. Streit . . . afterwards put in my hands an advance copy of his book 'Union Now', privately printed at Geneva, but due for publication in February." (cf Bul #11)

(4)
Imperial policies, cultural relations or British propaganda are maintained and carried on by a great complex of societies and agencies privately conducted by the aristocracy, some of which originated in Parliament and the whole more or less coordinated by the mysterious Foreign Office. A simplification of all these complexities is presented in "What Makes Lives", pp 151-164.

To many of these groups and agencies, Viscount Astor acts as patron and presiding officer. This family, almost as long British as it was American, was little more than a century ago German. His somewhat cosmopolitan view is that "America was beginning to see that never again would there be a world under the 'Pax Britannica', and that she would have to play a part in world affairs for her own interests". ( International Affairs, May-June, 1939)


BRITISH PROPAGANDA IN AMERICA: Improved Technique

Denial that there is any British propaganda in this country should be recognized as part of the propaganda,(1) which is useless if detected. Lord Macmillan announces, September 27, "The policy is that there shall be no propaganda in the United States of America".

The recently set up and publicly announced propaganda machine of Lord Macmillan rumbles clumsily in the old ruts, suppressing, twisting the news, reviving atrocities, but not yet portraying Germans making soap from battlefield cadavars as in 1916.

Look for British propaganda in editorials, articles, and the flattery of officials, where it is most effective. Be on the lookout for subtle new

-126-

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