NOTES
(1)
Sometime after the war, investigators will perhaps probe into the motives that lead expatriots, correspondents and commentators to promote the hate which made possible this war. Most will have been found to be sincere. The way was easy for the hate promoters, difficult for those who would stay the hysteria. Some yielded to pressure, some to bribes.
(2)
From early spring until fall, 1940, it was fashionable in academic circles to emphasize that there was no British propaganda, no need of it, that we were sophisticated and that events speak for themselves. Ambassador Page, Colonel House, Sir Gilbert Parker, H. G. Wells and innumerable other participants in the propaganda of 1916-18 in their memoirs had told frankly of their part. This was attributed to vainglorious boasting. Late in the fall a new fashion was introduced. Simultaneously from the professors of Harvard and other great universities that act as sounding boards, and from President Roosevelt himself, came the information that unfortunately a "myth" had grown up that Americans had been misled in the last war, and this was accompanied by denunciation of those who would dim the luster of those who had labored to bring us into that war and served through it.

MORE BOOKS THAT INFORM

Beware of promoted best seller propaganda books written by the haters, and those who pander to established prejudice. These suggestions of honest books are supplementary to those recommended in Bulletin #13 and preceding.(1)

Exposing Propaganda for War: "Words That Won The War", by James R. Mock and Cedric Larson ( Princeton U. Press, 1939), tells of the Creel propaganda in America twenty years ago. Look for improved technique in the repetition soon to come. "And So To War", by Hubert Herring ( Yale U. Press, 1939), traces the change in Roosevelt's views and utterances from peace toward war. " When War Comes: What Will Happen And What To Do", ed. Larry Nixon ( Greystone Press, 1939). The bill for the next war, 'win or lose'.

Light on the Current World Wide Social and Economic Revolution: " The Ending Of Hereditary American Fortunes", by Gustavus Myers ( Julian Messner, Inc., 1939); " The Evolution Of Finance Capitalism", by Geo. W. Edwards ( Longmans, 1939); " Business And Capitalism", by Prof. N. S. B. Gras, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration ( F. S. Crofts & Co., 1939); " Business And Modern Society",by Dean Wallace B. Donham and the Harvard Business Faculty ( Harvard University Press, 1938)

-162-

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