vizier for Nicholas Miraculous Butler, who in turn seems to be the academic representative of the British raj subservient to its financial agents in lower New York, has been the active organizer of both so-called White Committees, so active in modifying the Neutrality Law in giving away all possible to our one ally, and now in December, 1940, has started a new organization, France Forever (cf 383).

RECENT RESPONSES

Faculty members at Harvard, where the situation is strained, must remain anonymous. Brickbats are scarce.

"Many statements seem to be probably untrue and I should think some of them might be libelous. Your opinion that the American people are being 'led by the nose' into a war which they do not desire seems to me pure fancy. I see no evidence of dangerous war propaganda at the present time." C.P., Nov. 20.

"You are right about the foreign propaganda but I am sure you are too violent on the Harvard situation." H.E., Nov. 21. "Thanks for bulletins coming regularly. Enclosing a check for postage. You can't expect me to agree with everything you say, especially as God, Nature or a permanent appointment at Harvard has made me more of a middleof-the-road man than you." B.C., Nov. 20. "The situation here is so complex that it would take a book rather than a letter to describe my reactions. Certainly, nothing quite like it has happened at Harvard before. As for the outcome, however, I am afraid it will probably be the old story in the long run." S.J.E., Nov. 21. "I agree in general with what you say about the situation at Harvard. I have been interested in the bulletins." M.B.K., Nov. 20. "The bulletins have come and I have read them with interest. Will you please continue sending them? Enclosed are some stamps which will help." C.B.W., Nov. 21. "Your bulletin, as always is interesting." H.N.A., Nov. 22.

University Presidents write with more freedom,---"As you report to be the case at Harvard, it is certainly our undergraduates, as a whole, who are most dubious about the wisdom or effectiveness of going to war to save religion, democracy, England's trade routes, or anything else."Valentine of Rochester, Nov. 20. "Thank you for the bulletins. Don't stop! It is so easy for us to sympathize with England that we particularly need to be put on our guard. You are doing this admirably." Brewer of Olivet, Nov. 21. "Yes, I value the bulletins you have

-171-

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