(ship operator) has made no payment on its notes amounting to more than five million dollars.'" ( Friday, Feb. 21, 1941)
(6)
Occasional items in the newspapers have continued to report for the past two years the removal of mail from the American clippers and steamers that stop at Bermuda and to tell of the arrival of hundreds of additional Censors from England to continue the practice. It was reported that Secretary Hull protested again and again during the long period. At one time he even suggested that the Bermuda stop be omitted, but no change was made and it is evident that Hull's protests were for home consumption to quiet the American people while they were becoming conditioned to British ways.
(7)
The President in his lend-lease bill has finally provided that our Navy yards be made available for the repair of articles of defense, including British battleships, as Stimson has long been advocating.
(8)
"These wide-spread discussions on active issues of public policy are of great significance. They may well develop into a new type of democratic technique" ("American Youth"). The handicap to this is the great difficulty of organizing such public expression, of creating a government organization of volunteers to meet emergencies, to fight against and counteract your elected representatives who can be directly and secretly approached by lobbyists interested in passing the measure the people wish to oppose, and influenced by the pressure that the Administration through its patronage system can bring upon legislators to conform. A senator from Georgia may be elected with the connivance or at the direction of a few important men in Georgia. It takes only a few thousand votes. George was elected by one-fifth of 1% of the population (2% of 10%, cf Bul # 94).

"The important thing" says Taussig, "is not only to educate the citizen, and particularly the young citizen, to a sense of responsibility toward his country, but to make him conscious of his own civic potency." (This will probably not be very impressive in Georgia). "We must, however, be alert to detect efforts to destroy democracy under the guise of movements to change or even to maintain our present economic system. Indeed, capitalism is as good a camouflage for subversive activities as socialism. The unemployed, young or old, who submit to the indignity of enforced idleness without complaint, without active effort to change the system that is responsible for their condition, are not exercising their citizenship. They too are the enemies of democracy."


'WAR AND PEACE' PROPAGANDA

'Blessed are the peacemakers' for they shall call themselves the children of God, and shall inherit the earth. "Once more we deplore, we deplore and abhor the German attacks on our worth. It is cheek, but the meek turn the cheek ev'ry week and hope to inherit the earth." ( Douglas Reed, "Disgrace Abounding", Cape, 1939).

"A new and better peace" is the keynote of the current propaganda

-178-

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