(3)
December 3, 1940 Boake Carter wrote, "For Heavens' sake don't tell me that your magnificent work is coming to an end? It simply cannot be. Yours has been one of the most forthright and shining lights pointing down the true road for America amid a fog of propaganda, hysteria, smearing, name-calling, intellectual dishonesty, mental sophistry and immoral talk. For the love of Saint Peter, keep on."

THE FINNISH FLARE-UP

The pressure in Washington to bring us into participation in Great Britain's troubles had weakened in November. In England and Canada where they had been led to expect that we were coming in, there was the beginning of sad disappointed recrimination.

Finland, flaming across the newspaper pages, has turned the tide.(1) And ally sentiment is stronger than ever, a nationally distributed financial advisory letter confidentially tells his clients. Due to the war excitement the $500,000,000 additional for defense asked by the President will meet with popular and Congressional approval.

There is inside understanding that the President is heading us toward war. In his press conference, Dec. 5, it was reported in the Boston Herald, Dec. 6, the President was ready to "rebuff critics of his foreign policy. He said objection has come from statesmen in Russia and Germany, from the publicity director of the Republican National Committee--whose name he said he could not remember--and from a small number of politically-minded persons in the House and Senate."

In his speech to Congress, Sept. 21, he had declared, "In a period when it is sometimes said that free discussion is no longer compatible with national safety, may you by your deeds show the world that we of the United States are one people, of one mind, one spirit, one clear resolution, walking before God in the light of the living." (cf p 129) The Finnish mess makes this threat to our Civil Liberties imminent.

Our admiration goes out to the Finns, for their runners, for their great master Sibelius and his patriotic tone poem "Finlandia", for their valiant and vigorous defense of freedom. We owe them inspiration for our skiing, for our cooperatives, which some of our Liberty Leaguers still denounce as "Communistic" and "undermining the established economic structure" ( Chr Sci Monitor, Dec. 6).

Russia and all it stands for, on the other hand, has been exploited to create fear and hate in the American people, further fanned by the Dies

-187-

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