Religion and Morality we simply just adore
And as we've taken half the world we don't want any more.

From the Public Schools of England, where they rule 'em with a cane,
Have come our noblest statesmen, and Mister Chamberlain.
But when they tax us more and more and tax until it hurts,
I sometimes wish those 'Old School Ties' weren't worn on just stuffed
shirts.

January 24, 1940


NOTES
(1)
Those already in the war seem to fall into verse more readily than we Americans who linger on the brink. Sagittarius in the ( London) New Statesman and Nation presents this cogitation:

The public we know is an ass,
Fit only for general suppression,
Its conduct incredibly crass,
Its chatter one huge indiscretion.
It has just enough wit to perceive
A rather acute contradiction
Between facts it is bound to believe
And the newspapers' rose-colored fiction.

On Monday our forces advance,
On Tuesday, the foe has retreated,
On Wednesday, prepared for this chance,
Our fortunate feats are repeated,
On Thursday we strike a hard blow,
Our moves are completely effective,
On Friday, however, the foe
Has somehow attained his objective.

The news for our good is controlled,
Though our views are, of course, not requested
We know that all may not be told
Before it is well predigested,
But the experts have never found out
That nothing so daunts and depresses
As the news of an actual rout
After series of rumored successes.

A Scot correspondent has sent me the following poem by a "Welsh-born American", "neither of us would sacrifice the life of one American boy to save either of our countries of birth. Why should America be goaded into a war to

-254-

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