(2)
Secretary Lansing tells in his "Memoirs" how "seized American business letters were copied by the London Board of Trade and passed around to British business men who thus learned U. S. trade secrets and got an edge on their U. S. competitors". Today the gentle protests of Mr. Hull are for home consumption, as were Mr. Lansing's in the last war, for as he later explained, "'there was always in my mind the conviction that we would ultimately become an ally of Great Britain' and that then 'we would presumably wish to adopt some of the policies and practices which the British had adopted.'" ( Life, Feb. 5, 1940) Mr. Polk, of the State Department, in 1917 remarked to the British Foreign Minister, "Mr. Balfour, it took Great Britain three years to reach a point where it was prepared to violate all the laws of blockade. You will find that it will take us only two months to become as great criminals as you are."
(3)
The Athenia claims seem to be pigeon-holed at the State Department and further information suppressed. An AP cable, Sept. 1, 1940, from Berlin, referring to the sinking of a British ship carrying 320 British refugee children to Canada, suggesting a mine and denying the possibility of a submarine, brought this editorial comment in the Boston Herald, Sept. 2, 1940, "When the Athenia was sunk by undetermined means at the outbreak of the war a year ago, Germany contended the British sank it with the idea of ascribing the guilt to Germany." In the " Encyclopaedia of World History" ( Houghton Mifflin Company, 1940), the revision of Ploetz famed "Epitome", compiled and edited chiefly by Harvard professors, most of whom show an hysterical provincial pro- British trend, we read, "Sept. 4. Sinking of the British ship Athenia with considerable loss of life. The origin of the attack was never determined."

The State Department was equally secretive in regard to the route of the Army Transport, "American Legion", bringing refugees and royalty from Petsamo. Reporters were told "It's a military secret". The British and German governments both knew. It was a secret only from the American people ( Uncensored, Aug. 31). The transport, under Captain Torning, reached Petsamo "via the short and normally safe route near Iceland" and Captain Torning expected to "head home by the same course", Newsweek reported Sept. 9, and Time claimed the President, who has in the past seen submarines where they were not, had knowledge that if they took the northern route a German submarine was to hold them up and kidnap the crown princess. The "American Legion" was directed by the President through the State Department to take a course through the Scottish isles, which the Germans warned was mined.


ON TO DICTATORSHIP

A "modern, stream-lined totalitarian dictatorship" is what we are coming to, Sen. Taft warned a Lincoln Day North Carolina audience.

President Roosevelt, telling the Youth Congress how prosperous the U.S. had become under his rule, spoke of the 'absolute dictatorship' of

-290-

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