gives evidence of having been written under the stress of deep emotion. I am enclosing herewith a copy of my reply to Mr. Cox in which I hit merely the high spots of the answer I would make to him if I felt that his statement were worthy of any serious attention."

Last year our payments for gold were over three billions. This coming year we will buy more. All this will be paid for eventually by the taxpayer out of American labor and resources. A duty of $15 an ounce would stop it. But it will not be stopped. Many forces have been enlisted to continue this once little understood 'Subsidy for War'.(8)

February 20, 1940


NOTES
(1)
The Bank of France storage vaults for gold, eighty feet below the surface of the rock foundation, were even better protected with steel and concrete than the Maginot Line and moreover could be instantly flooded. May 31, 1940, the Bank reported a gold reserve of a value of about 1693 million dollars, most of which has come into possession of the Reich.

Eliot Janeway optimistically prophesied, "Britain has unlimited gold supplies in Africa, whence gold is mined, shipped over here, buried again in Kentucky, and regarded as payment for the goods we send her. As long as Britain's gold supplies are limitless, and our willingness to accept the metal continues, she will need no credits such as were given her in the World War."

(2)
The U. S. Commerce Department, Jan. 13, AP, reported that gold imports set a new record for 1940 amounting to 4,749 millions. The peak was reached in July with more than 500 millions. The flow of Russian gold may be increased by the lifting of the "moral embargo" by the State Department in January, 1941, in an attempt to cousen Stalin. "That this 'friendly gesture' to Moscow will accomplish its purpose may be doubted", editorially remarks the Detroit Free Press.
(3)
"This rebellion rolling around the world is also a fight against the rule of the gold bloc, the last citadel of which is in the Kentucky hills. Gold was the heavy blood of the empire. But the deep irony of the present conflict is that most of the heavy blood had been siphoned out before the battle even began. The old-time economy of England was weakened and half-broken before assault started. Even token payments on the debts, the last salve of honorable conscience, had been abandoned. Curiously enough, the United States, trying to bolster up the empire, trying to save the gold bloc and traditional financial and trading methods, helped destroy the system that gold represented quite some time before the Nazi onslaught. We drained away the blood of France and the empire. Now it lies congealed in gold bars in our vaults.

"Do we imagine, as France foolishly sought to do in the Balkans, that because of our gold we can buy up Latin America like so many pounds of coffee? That we can sell goods unless we buy? The fact is, our old weapons of finance capital,

-298-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Getting US into War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 640

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.