Country Day Sch., N. Y. "We have been enjoying your bulletin and appreciating it"--Edna Elliott, The Desert Sun Sch., Calif. "Have enjoyed them very much, preserved them. Trust that you will continue this service"--Floyd C. Fretz, Supt. Bradford City Schs., Pa.

"These are hysterical times and sober men are likely to be sent to prison!"-- Charles Beard. "You are doing a swell job, and don't forget to send me everything."--Hubert Herring, Committee on Cultural Relations with Latin America. "I've just finished reading with much interest and profit your latest bulletins." --Walter B. Cannon, Harvard University Medical School. "I have enjoyed reading your bulletins and apologize for not having expressed earlier my appreciation for receiving them."--Mark A. May, Yale University Institute of Human Relations. "Interested in the bulletins you sent."--Wendell L. Willkie. "Have been receiving your bulletins and reading them with interest."--Frank D. Graham, Princeton University, co-author "Golden Avalanche".

Bulletin #52 was of contemporary interest in response to questions of correspondents. "What To Do Now" suggested, that the socially minded join or organize a group, the politically minded vote, individuals, writers challenge speakers, send letters to newspapers making known their attitude and protesting what they consider abuses.

"One feels hopelessly ineffectual when one lists once more the few ways of making public opinion felt--letters to the President, senators, congressmen and the newspapers; mass meetings, the forwarding of resolutions, talks on the radio (when there is no money available for such talks)--that is all that one can say. I have long wondered whether this is not the fundamental weakness of democracy, this inability of the masses to do what rich, powerful pressure groups can achieve. The dissenting peace-lovers or anti-conscriptionists or opponents of large armaments simply cannot make their wishes known and controlling even where they are in the vast majority. Here is a rock upon which the ship of state may be foundering and democracy being riven asunder. Here is something to my mind far more ominous than the presence among us of spies and agents of dictators and fifth columnists generally. For we can deal with the latter if we wish; there is no immediate remedy for that lack of majority rule which theoretically is supreme in the United States." ( Villard, Christian Century, Jan. 22, 1941)


WHAT THIS WAR WILL COST US

U. S. Federal peacetime spending at the rate of 25 millions a day ( Whaley-Eaton, Apr. 2) equals Britain's spending in its war effort. Since Jan. 1 appropriations by Congress for Army and Navy have mounted to over 4 billions. But we can't put all the blame on the present administration. 'Peace-loving', we are war mongers. Our 1920-33 expenditures for armaments ($11,839,327,866) exceeded any other nation's.(1)

Newsweek, June 3, reports Mr. Roosevelt "refused to divulge the

-336-

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