kian, Hacobian, and Essayan. But it was to their control, Royal Shell, that Chamberlain in the spring of 1939 turned over all the oil resources of the Empire. Now though oil conscious, they have become uxorious, soft, ripe for the plucking by the formerly down-trodden, rickety, starved survivors of the 1919-20 British blockade. (cf Bul #13 and Notes)

"The way of salvation of humanity,--" Mencken said in his Sunday sermon Dec. 1, 1940, "first the underprivileged are liberated from the law of natural selection by one gang of bogus messiahs, and then another gang of bogus messiahs falls upon the liberators, to the loud applause, and usually with the hearty aid, of the underprivileged".

(5)
Bernard Shaw early made a suggestion that would have shortened the last war. He wrote Nov. 14, 1914, "We must kill the German women if we mean business when we talk of destroying Germany. Men are comparatively of no account. Kill 90 per cent of their German men, and the remaining 10 per cent can repeople her. But kill the women, and delenda est Carthago". Shaw, who dislikes "the moral babble ( Milton's phrase) of his sanctimonius colleagues" is humane and realistic in his suggestions but he does not tell how to accomplish the result he wishes. Bacteriologists might discover a disease that, propagated and spread over Germany by airplane, would destroy the reproductive power. Or physicists may discover a ray, they have in fact, which could even be directed from a distance for that purpose. To some, such measures would seem more humane, even more Christian, than the slow killing of the children, the old and the weak, by deprivation, malnutrition, starvation. But that is justified by the practices of the British blockade of the past and the present, and upheld by American moralists, college presidents and bishops.

100% (ANGLO-) AMERICAN (IMPERIALIST)

Under the title "Sworn to Secrecy" the May 20 issue of In Fact said,-- "Eighteen prominent figures met secretly on April 29th. America, they resolved, must be in a position to give whatever aid--even armies-- required by the Allies. Apparently called by Frederic R. Coudert, legal advisor to the British Embassy in 1915-1920", attending were(1) Thomas W. Lamont, Nicholas Murray Butler, Henry L. Stimson, Wendell Willkie, Lewis Douglas, Frank Polk, and Philip M. Brown, who "submitted a memorandum . . . expressing the outlook of those present. Neutrality legislation must go. Nothing must stand in the way of America giving full help to Great Britain and France, even if that means armed aid."(2)

In the Harvard Alumni Bulletin April 16, was published a letter from Thomas Lamont, influential alumnus, tactfully rebuking the undergraduates reluctance to accept "the moral issues" of this war.(3)

-352-

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