that kind of an advertisement. We're not a big bank, and we don't make a lot of money, but since 1929 we have earned a good deal more than our net worth in 1929; we've doubled our volume, returned to our stockholders about 80% of the investment they had in the business when the stock market broke, and have probably increased our net worth retained in the business by 30% or 40%. While such advertisements as this are not designed to secure business, they incidentally prove to be a thousand times better advertising than the same space would be if it were devoted to extolling the virtues of our little institution."

The advertisement referred to was a paid full page in the Topeka Daily State Journal, which began, "Don't Declare War! Prepare Rapidly for Defense! Stop Playing Politics with National Safety! Congress Refuse to Adjourn! To declare war when to all practical purposes we have no army and no weapons and no air force, and when Hitler is at the highest point of his military strength, would be an act of fools. It would be a complete surrender to Allied propaganda. It must not happen! The pressure the Allies put on Washington is terrific. It is abundantly clear that Roosevelt wants war. He has all but promised it. The pressure he can put on Congress is tremendous. The pressure the people can put on Congress is greater." This is over Burrow's own name.

An editorial in Col. Knox Manchester, N. H., Union called William Allen White "a great American and a sterling patriot" and referred to him as "the wise, kindly, peace-loving sage of Emporia". On July 3 Senator Holt brought out in the Senate committee investigation that "Knox through his financial obligation resulting from the purchase of the Chicago Daily News, is beholden to International Bankers with interventionist designs".


40 MILLION CONSCRIPTS

June 7 in a leading editorial the N.Y. Times came out for immediate conscription. The President approved, his followers chorused. Senator Norris said, "I'm not for it".(1) June 8 the House Military Committee favored the use of our National Guard anywhere in the Western hemisphere.

June 20 a bill was introduced in the Senate. It provides for the drafting of all men from 18 to 65, nearly 40 million. After all eliminations, at least 7 million would be left, and we have officers and physical facilities for training only 50,000 new men a month ( Time, June 24). The measure is sponsored by the National Emergency Committee of the Military Training Camps Association, actively promoted by university men and self styled as representing "the thought and opinions . . . of many prominent persons in various walks of life" ( N.Y. Times).

-361-

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