(6)
"There is certain evidence of profiteering on every bit as large a scale as in 1914-18. The true size of profits is obscured in a variety of ways", such as amounts set aside to pay bondholders, or for taxes, or in the form of excessive depreciation reserves, in addition to extra reserves for "contingencies". (Economic Notes, Sept. 1940) (For other data on profits cf Buls #24, 38, 48, 50, 88)

IS WILLKIE'S WHITE BLACK, AS PAINTED?

"Give me ten billion dollars and I could make a Chinaman president". This cynicism is attributed to William Allen White by a letterwriter to PM, July 2. PM has not replied to inquiry for confirmation.

To "Ol' Bill White", "this lovable, pseudo-progressive Kansan", "I devote considerable space in my book", writes W. G. Clugston, wellknown Kansas attorney of vouched integrity, in his "Rascals in Democracy". "No living journalist has done more to uphold the existing order of society by preying upon the emotions of the people and patting the Main Street Overlords upon the back. No one presents such a perfect picture of the Pseudo-Progressive who succumbs to the temptation to parboil his ideals in the fleshpots." White's "appetite for power and prestige" led him "to dominate the public affairs of his state" and "drove him into acts and alliances" with some connected with "the Kansas million dollar forgery" of state bonds. "White led the fight to . . . exert undue and unjust influence on the Senate Court of Impeachment" to save "the attorney general".

What the People Said, by W. L. White, son of William Allen White, tells in fiction what Clugston calls "this amazing corruption of the government. Young White made it plain . . . that his able, talented father was of that weighed-and-found-wanting leadership."

"I liked your comment that Seldes had 'reverence for White'. That is what everybody has who doesn't know the man. All of us reverence little children. Putting a pen in White's hand is like putting a loaded shotgun in the hands of a two year old", writes J. R. Burrow, president of the Central National Bank, Topeka.

George Seldes had written me that he had so much "reverence for White that when we got the list of names of the people at this 'secret meeting', I spotted William Allen White and could not believe that the great editor, my friend, and the endorser of all my books would be in that conspiratorial company. I cut his name out, not to suppress, but to

-379-

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