Ten years ago, to keep foot-and-mouth disease out of this country, a clause in the Smoot-Hawley tariff imposed a total embargo on meats from Argentina. Roosevelt "negotiated the Sanitary Convention, which would have rectified what the President himself described as an 'obvious inequity'. But the Senate has never ratified it." (p 150, Fortune, Sept. '40)

A cable, Sept. 6, 1940 ( N. Y. Times) from Buenos Aires quoted Dr. Melo as saying in an address that when he visited at Hyde Park after the Havana Conference, Mr. Roosevelt repeated to him the assurances which he gave when he visited Buenos Aires in 1936. Putting aside the text of his speech, Melo said extemporaneously, "Mr. Roosevelt told me that the present hour is one of political and electoral struggle and, therefore, not propitious to push this issue, because there are some Western senators who are more inclined to listen to the aspirations of their voters than the indications of their President. I replied, 'Oh, well, between good friends there is no need to rush matters such as this. We can wait until after the elections.'" This "stirred up a political storm' in Washington, AP, Sept. 7. "The White House issued a denial. Rep. Horton said in a statement, that 'once again Mr. Roosevelt has to deny that he has made a secret agreement. . . .' that Col. Fulgencio Batista, President-elect of Cuba, told the Cuban Legislature recently that a treaty was in preparation with the United States to cut tariffs on Cuban sugar. 'That, too, was promptly denied by Mr. Roosevelt.'" Sen. Thomas reminded that last March 28 he had predicted, if the Hull trade agreement program was endorsed, just such lowering of tariffs on "Practically every agricultural commodity we produce. I might well have added that we could expect this after the November election."

Another N. Y. Times cable, Buenos Aires, Sept. 7, says Melo "tonight denied" having quoted Roosevelt "as saying that after the November elections the Senate would ratify the sanitary convention", but merely "that the senators logically would listen to their voters, since the present hour was a political one and not propitious for considering this matter, for which a solution would be found later". ( Melo's words) ( Fortune, Sept. 1940, "Twenty Nations and One")

(4)
With all the publicity on the bases acquired, nothing came out at the Havana Conference, almost nothing has been heard in regard to the Dutch possessions of the West Indies seized by the French and British simultaneously, and almost nothing has been permitted to appear about the French possession, Martinique, besieged by the British. But it is apparent to anyone who thinks twice that all these years the access to the Panama Canal was directly controlled by Great Britain, threatened by France, or by any power that possessed the Dutch islands. The necessity of America's obtaining the key points in the Caribbean, held by Great Britain, has been repeatedly emphasized, more particularly by W. Adolphe Roberts in "The Caribbean: The Story of Our Sea of Destiny" (Bobbs-Merrill, 1940). (cf p 461)
(5)
"If we support such dictators we have no kick coming if at the first propitious moment they return to the roost of the Nazi coop, where they more logic

-413-

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