Roosevelt is following in Hitler's footsteps(7) along the road to dictatorship. Let's stop this drift to totalitarianism.

"Short of war",(8) says 'short-of-dictatorship' Roosevelt. "Men do not jump halfway down Niagara Falls", remarks Sen. Ashurst. September 6, 1940


NOTES
(1)
" The Armed Horde 1793-1939,--A Study of the Rise, Survival and Decline of the Mass Army" ( Putnam, 1940) by Hoffman Nickerson, carries on the title page "'Universal, conscript, military service . . . with its twin brother universal suffrage . . . has mastered all continental Europe, . . . with what promises of massacre and bankruptcy for the Twentieth Century!'--Taine: 'Origines De La France Contemporaine,' 1891." The book is dedicated to Major- GeneralJ. F. C. Fuller, British Army Ret., Master-Analyst of War", whose forecasts and prophecies and warnings have proved true to the embarrassment of those higher-ups who formerly derided him. The proclamation of the French Assembly in 1792 announced "The young men shall fight; the married men shall forge the weapons . . . the women will make tents and clothes . . . the children will make up old linen into lint; the old men will . . . preach hatred."

Nickerson's thesis is that conscription and the mass army originated with the French Revolution and is a feature of democracy and will always favor revolution. "The all-devouring totalitarian state was invented not by the dictators of today but by the democrats of the first French Republic." All this was pointed out by Lawrence Dennis in his letter of August 24, 1940 in which he said, "Many, for example most of the members and supporters of the Civilian Military Training Camps Association, favor conscription because they believe it will be a force for conservatism and an antidote for the subversive isms and for revolution. In this belief they are 100% wrong. Conscription was born in the French Revolution and forced on Europe by the revolutionary Napoleon. . . ."

(2)
Speculation on the line of march of that expeditionary force is made by Paul Mallon ( Nov. 6, 1940): "Next big struggle of the war will be made for Africa--the whole of it--and that is where the British will want us to come in." Assuming that "in the end the British might roll right back up to Berlin by any path the Germans could cut to Africa, across the Dardanelles and Gibraltar", Mallon brings out that for such a back door invasion of Europe, "the British would need every ounce of military might they can muster. They must keep large forces at home to meet the threat of invasion which will be kept constantly before them. Up to now they have not been able to use more American help than they have been getting. But they will be able to use it then. Pressure for American participation should be expected to grow accordingly."
(3)
"Of all the familiar 'bunk' perpetrated in the name of war, none is quite

-444-

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