are perfectly mad to be 'in the game'", stated Senator Hiram Johnson to the AP, Dec. 4, 1940.

THE VOTER'S DILEMMA

"The President's Predicament" produces "The Voter's Dilemma". The resulting confusion is well expressed by a forward-looking publisher, Richard R. Smith, New York City, who writes August 28, 1940: "Your bulletins leave me in a state of doubt. . . . You state that you are trying to expose and not to advocate, but one who is as active as you must have his own convictions.(1) You obviously are anti-Roosevelt, but I am wondering what your real attitude toward Willkie is. If one accepts your bulletins, one might as well conclude that we had better jump in the river or at least stay away from the polls on election day."

Let's have more light before we are convicted. Convictions of the past still leave me penitent. Fooled by Theodore's "Square Deal", Woodrow's "New Freedom", and Franklin's "New Deal", I would willingly wend with Willkie were I not suspicious of a "raw deal".(2)(3)

The popular myth "Willkie" has been beautifully built by the country's most talented artists in advertising and public relations. Russell Davenport, who discovered Willkie a year ago in a week-end at his Norfolk home, is himself poet, painter, philosopher, with "a passion for astrology". Before the Republican National Convention, he secured the date and hour of birth of his associates. "His own chart . . . showed that he had a 'good year ahead', he was willing to admit, but he never would tell what Willkie's showed. . . . He has an idea that he has discovered the 'perfect control problem', the scientific approach by which he can test the validity of his astrological forecasts" ( Ehrlich, Sept. 1).

Willkie's horoscope is also cast by the editors of the New Republic in their twenty-page Special Section of Sept. 2 on "This Man Willkie", who "has accepted a fearful responsibility, as President Roosevelt has". They give an unpleasing picture of how he "fought the TVA with injunctions, spite lines, paid propaganda and whiskey at elections", how "his Michigan company tried to suppress a labor union".

"It is astonishing in how many ways he resembles President Roosevelt. Like That Man, he is an actor born to the stage." At the National Press Club in Washington, his "hearers found his advocacy of a busi

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