time-worn abstraction for which Charlotte Corday sacrificed her life and on the guillotine discovered what crimes could be committed in its name. In a column adjacent to this picture, Robert Choate, in an editorial commenting on how Willkie has crept up in the campaign, remarked, "It can be done".
(3)
But " Willkie takes his responsibilities with high seriousness. It is altogether possible that if elected President he would serve one hundred and thirty million Americans even more faithfully than he served two hundred thousand C. & S. stockholders" ( Dorothy Dunbar Bromley, "The Education of Wendell Willkie", Harper's, October, 1940).
(4)
Secretary Ickes, responding to Willkie's assault on the corrupt "city machines" that supported Roosevelt, came back, "I can tell you whose baby the corrupt political machine is, or at least I can name its paternal ancestors for two generations back. Its grandfather is the railroads of America. Its father is the public utilities" (Oct. 18, AP).
(5)
Both parties had plenty of reserve ammunition which was never used in the campaign. But Edward J. Flynn, Democratic National Chairman, as things warmed up did say, Sept. 28, "Willkie's nomination was demanded by Wall Street financial interests, fronted by Mr. Lamont of J. P. Morgan & Co. . . . he has successfully represented the large moneyed interests of this country against the plain citizens . . .". He had been discovered by Mr. Lamont in 1935 and put to straightening out the rather desperate Morgan promotion, Commonwealth & Southern (cf New Republic).

Flynn further asserted that Willkie "has been a machine politician all his adult life . . . He was a Tammany County committeeman in New York, he was associated with the State Central Committee in Ohio, he was affiliated with the Summit County organization in that same state. He was a spellbinder for the organization in Elwood and he was a lobbyist in Washington as well as in various States in which he lived." Again he charged "the Nation's press was 'under a dictatorship of financial interests of advertisers'". When the Democratic Times flopped to Willkie, Flynn quoted from a speech of Sulzberger in 1937, "The New York Times this year has lost a large amount of advertising . . . because of its support of President Roosevelt during the ( 1936) campaign".

(6)
The heavy tanks we are designing (and building ?) which cannot be completed for three or four years, could have only one conceivable use and that is against the Maginot or Siegfried Line. The force of two million or more that we are planning to equip could only be used as an expeditionary force in Europe. But isn't the chief desire of the Administration to destroy Hitler? And how can it be done without going after him?

THE PRESIDENT'S SECRETS

Wilson's "open covenants openly arrived at" are regarded as more 'obsolete' by our President than our planes, destroyers, tanks.(1)

-450-

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