(9)
"To succeed in the war we must keep business, big and little, on a profitable scale of prices. There is no other hope or prospect for the country" ( N. Y. Sun, 1917). "Of the thirty billion dollars spent" in the last war under such men as Baruch and Willard, "fifteen billions constituted 'reasonable profits to stimulate the patriotism of the business interests." 2.5 billions were recovered in excess- and war-profits taxes in 1918, and 1.4 billions in 1919. This time we are not attempting anything like that. ( Carl Dreher, Harper's, Oct. 1940)

"Conscript wealth and what have you got to defend?" asked Westbrook Pegler in his column, Sept. 1940. Said Wendell Willkie, "Wealth in the hands of the few is the only thing democracy has that is worth fighting for".

(10)
Senator Holt speaking on politics in national defense, Congressional Record, Sept. 23, 1940, pointing to numerous cases of profiteering, warns that those who charge extravagance and waste are smeared as being against defense. In the making of contracts, he tells us ". . . this so-called speed is only an excuse . . . They are not negotiated to increase speed. Time will prove that the war profiteering coming out . . . of 1917 look small in comparison."

THE 'WEALTH CONSCRIPTION' HOAX

The confusion in Washington has spread over the country. It results from attempts to fool the people, to work them into a lather of hysteria. That's the means of winning their votes. They call that 'politics'.

Votes must be won to perpetuate or gain power. That is what the big fight is about. There are but two ways to make a donkey or an elephant go,--threat or bait. Threat of imminent peril is promoted by movies, radio, press. Hysteria stampedes voters. As compensation for the multitude, the bait is 'conscript industry', 'conscript wealth'.

The 'conscription of wealth' sections in the Burke-Wadsworth bill are mere political expediencies to get through the draft of manpower, and will then be "eased off", Business Week points out September 7.(1)

"So far as this conscription of industry rider, which the Senate tacked on to the military draft bill . . . it was one of those politically inspired measures passed for the obvious purpose of making it easier for some senators to defend their vote for the conscription of young men", remarks "The Investor" columnist in the Boston Herald, Sept. 4.

The 'draft industry' measure, reports a leading financial advisory letter, was "apparently not contemplated by the New York group which originated the draft bill, thinking of it as a form of discipline for the irresponsible masses, a 'conservative' measure".

Of the senators who voted 69 to 16 to 'conscript industry', "paying

-467-

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