cause the Englishman is so cocksure of himself and his own superiority. No nation can go about conquering the world unless she is quite certain of her 'civilizing' mission. The moment, however, that you begin to think and see something in the other nation or the other fellow and his ways, your moral conviction leaves you, and your empire collapses. The British Empire still stands today because the Englishman still believes that his ways are the only correct ways and because he cannot tolerate anybody who does not conform to his standards. The English maxim is--When you are traveling in Rome, do exactly as at home." ( Lin Yutang , "With Love and Irony", John Day, 1940)

ADJUSTMENT AND CHANGE

"The world order which we seek is the cooperation of free countries, working together in a friendly, civilized society", the President declared in addressing Congress in his annual message January 6, 1941.

"Since the beginning of our American history we have been engaged in change--in a perpetual peaceful revolution--a revolution which goes on steadily, quietly adjusting itself to changing conditions."

President Roosevelt arrives at many things by intuitions and hunches as the result of his many contacts. An authority on the early American navy, the President has little time for reading solid books on economic and international affairs, what with detective stories and his stamp collection for relaxation. His close adviser Adolf Berle understands what is happening. When Germany invaded Poland, he remarked, "This is the beginning of the world revolution". ( Pearson and Allen, July 8, 1940)

It is an American conception this idea of perpetual revolution, the continuous turning of the wheel and unending progress forward. Ely Culbertson in his brilliant autobiography, "The Strange Lives of One
Man
" ( Winston Co., 1940) tells of his conversation as a young man interested in the Russian revolution with his Pennsylvania born father, who admonished, "and as for your being a revolutionist--well, dammit, we Americans are natural revolutionists! Only, Ely, if you must be one, there don't disgrace your poor old father: lead, and don't be led."(1)

Our nation was born of 'Revolution', but the word has been tabu. Only the 'Daughters' dared flaunt it, and with the implication that all that was past. When the repressed and resentful nations broke through the cordon of buffer states, they were looked upon as rebels, 'aggressors', just a nuisance to be suppressed.

-615-

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