Dangerous Peace: New Rivalry in World Politics

By Alpo M. Rusi | Go to book overview

international rivalry, Africa and Latin America may develop peacefully and successfully while others compete between each other.


Notes
1.
Reinhold Niebuhr, Nations and Empires: Recurring Patterns in the Political Order ( London: Faber and Faber), 1960. p. 1; Henry A. Kissinger, Diplomacy ( New York: Simon & Schuster), 1994, pp. 23-24; Riccardo Petrella, "A Global Agora vs. Gated City-Republics", New Perspectives Quarterly, Winter 1995, pp. 21-22.
2.
See, for example, Deepak Lal, "Trade Blocs and Multipolar Free Trade", Journal of Common Market Studies, Number 3, 1993, pp. 349-358. Lal makes the argument that there is the current prospect "of a strengthening of regional trading blocs at the expense of the multilateral trading system."
3.
Joseph Nye, "American Strategy After Bipolarity", International Affairs, Number 3, 1990, p. 513.
4.
Alvin Toffler and Heidi Toffler, "Mapping out a Trisected World", International Herald Tribune, November 5, 1993.
5.
For the opening statement of this debate, see Francis Fukuyama, "The End of History", The National Interest, Summer 1989. Fukuyama argued that democratic values and market economy have become universal, which meant that the era of ideological struggle dating back to the French Revolution had ended. This kind of idealistic euphoria was attacked most conspicuously by John J. Mearsheimer in "Back to the Future: Instability in Europe After the Cold War", International Security, Summer 1990.
6.
The argument of the transition of trading blocs into political powers was put by The Economist ( January 8, 1994) in a very simplistic but visionary manner: "A strong America, an advancing China, a struggling Russia and an uncertain Europe make up the new quartet of big powers. The interplay of their interests and the threat of proliferation will fix the rudiments of the next world order."
7.
See Christopher Layne, "The Unipolar Illusion", International Security, Vol. 17, 1993. My book stresses that the idea of the international system remains always to a certain extent abstract, descriptive and theoretical. The system has among its subsystems a set of actors (states, like Russia, China and the United States, or communities of states, like the European Union). A major work about the international system is by Morton Kaplan, System and Process in International Politics ( New York: John Wiley & Sons), 1957. Kaplan's analysis has been subject to strong criticism by a number of scholars. The term "world order," as the author of this book uses it, signifies an analytical structure that makes possible understanding and prediction, hence policy and diplomacy. The current transitory order (or the new "disorder") is based primarily on the system

-7-

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Dangerous Peace: New Rivalry in World Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 7
  • 2 - Collapsing Bipolarity 11
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - Emergence of the New Economic System 35
  • Notes 54
  • 4 - New Geopolitical Actors on the Rise 59
  • Notes 90
  • 5 - Toward a New Global Rivalry 97
  • Notes 109
  • 6 - The Global Order for the 21st Century: Positive Interrelationship or Conflictual Rivalry? 113
  • Notes 131
  • 7 - Constructing the Real Future 135
  • Notes 145
  • Appendix 149
  • Bibliography 171
  • About the Book and Author 183
  • Index 185
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