Dangerous Peace: New Rivalry in World Politics

By Alpo M. Rusi | Go to book overview

frontational approach, and neither the diplomatic or academic communities should spare effort in trying to devise common direction for Sino- American security cooperation in the late 1990s.

In the final analysis, the most promising future for the coming period in East Asia is that of a combination of a loose balance of power embodying areas of political and economic cooperation among the states concerned, with the U.S.-Japan alliance as the stabilizing core of the region. It could sustain the movement toward ever more open markets in a way that will forestall the formation of an exclusivist East Asian yen- dominated trading bloc and will advance a Pacific Basin-wide economic and political community. The question which will then remain is whether the U.S.-led coalition of East Asian states and Japan--if realized--with its policy of appeasement which is reflected in Clinton's policy shift vis- a-vis China will find itself on the road toward a new "Munich"--a peace settlement which then would lead, not toward a lasting "peace in our time," but toward a hegemonic war. I assume that the Clinton initiative constitutes a real policy alternative to start building a "regional concert" among China, the United States, Japan and other states in East Asia. 27


Notes
1.
Charles W. Kegley Jr., and Eugene R. Wittkopf, World Politics: Trends and Transformation ( fifth edition) ( New York: St. Martin's Press), 1995, p. 73; Sandra Suguwara, "Putting Their Eggs in a Massive Chinese Basket", The Washington Post, March 31, 1996; Michael Richardson, "U.S.-China-Japan Balance: Signs of Stress", International Herald Tribune, April 4, 1996; quoted from Kenneth Auchincloss, "Friend or Foe", Newsweek, April 1, 1996; Zakaria, "Is Realism Finished?" pp. 21-32.
2.
See Taylor, "Geopolitical World Order"; Taylor discusses four possible geopolitical orders as alternatives to the post-Cold War "unipolarity," which I find being over by the mid-1990s. There are a number of different scenarios in this respect available in the current literature of international relations. However, I find many of them disregard the rise of China. Johan Galtung, for example, is of the opinion that the world system may consist of three possible systems in the future: (1) rivalry among the ten biggest nations; (2) rivalry among three pan-regions; and (3) north-south conflict. See his The True Worlds ( New York: Free Press), 1979.
3.
Cohen, Geopolitics in the New World Era, pp. 18-23.

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Dangerous Peace: New Rivalry in World Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 7
  • 2 - Collapsing Bipolarity 11
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - Emergence of the New Economic System 35
  • Notes 54
  • 4 - New Geopolitical Actors on the Rise 59
  • Notes 90
  • 5 - Toward a New Global Rivalry 97
  • Notes 109
  • 6 - The Global Order for the 21st Century: Positive Interrelationship or Conflictual Rivalry? 113
  • Notes 131
  • 7 - Constructing the Real Future 135
  • Notes 145
  • Appendix 149
  • Bibliography 171
  • About the Book and Author 183
  • Index 185
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