4
An Episode in the Market
12 We entered the market-place just as daylight was fading.
We observed there quite a collection of goods for sale, none
of them of any value--just the sort of merchandise whose
shoddiness the darkness of evening could most readily con-
ceal. We too had brought along the stolen cloak,* so we
proceeded to exploit this most favourable opportunity, and
in a corner of the market we waggled the hem of the gar-
ment up and down, hoping that its bright colour would
attract a buyer. Almost at once a peasant, whom I seemed
to recognize, and his female companion came up and be-
gan to examine the cloak with some care. Ascyltus in turn
glanced at the peasant's shoulder, and suddenly held his
breath and fell silent. I too was somewhat shaken at the
sight of the fellow, for he looked very like the man who had
come across my shirt out in the country: he was clearly the
very man. Ascyltus could scarcely trust his eyes. Not wishing
to surrender to impulse, he first edged closer, as though he
were a prospective purchaser. He pulled the edge of the
garment from the man's shoulders, and fingered it with
some care.
13 Fortune plays some strange games. The peasant hadn't as
yet so much as run inquisitive fingers along the stitching.
There was even a hint of disdain in his sales pitch, as though
he'd filched the garment from a beggar. Once Ascyltus noted
our treasure still intact,* and the mean status of the vendor,
he took me aside a little from the crowd, and said: 'Hey,
look, dear boy! That treasure whose loss I was lamenting
is back with us! That shirt of ours seems to be bulging with
the gold coins intact. So how do we set about lawfully claim-
ing our property?' My own spirits were soaring not merely
because I could see the loot, but also because Fortune had

-9-

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The Satyricon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Satyricon i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Select Bibliography xlvi
  • 1 - At the School of Rhetoric 1
  • 2 - Dubious Encounters in the Town 5
  • 3 - Jealousy at the Lodging 7
  • 4 - An Episode in the Market 9
  • 5 - Enter Quartilla, the Priapic Priestess 12
  • 6 - Dinner at Trimalchio's 20
  • 7 - Giton Spurns Encolpius for Ascyltus 67
  • 8 - Eumolpus in the Art Gallery 71
  • 9 - Reconciliation with Giton; Eumolpus as Rival 79
  • 10 - The Episode on Ship. Enter Lichas and Tryphaena 88
  • 11 - The Journey to Croton 110
  • 12 - The Encounter with Circe 124
  • 13 - Eumolpus and the Legacy-Hunters 145
  • Index and Glossary of Names 205
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