9
Reconciliation with Giton; Eumolpus
as Rival
91 I caught sight of Giton leaning against the wall, holding
towels and scrapers. He was downcast and disturbed; you
could see that he was not enjoying his menial role. So to
obtain proof of what my eyes told me . . .
He turned on me a face which dissolved in delight, and
said: 'Dear brother, have pity on me. I can speak freely,
away from the scene of battle. Deliver me from that blood-
stained brigand; punish your repentant judge*as savagely as
you like. I shall be sufficiently consoled in my misery if my
downfall is at your wish.' I told him to stifle his lamenta-
tions, to ensure that no one should overhear our plans. I
gave Eumolpus the slip, for he was declaiming in the baths;
then I ushered Giton out through a dark and dirty exit, and
sped on wings back to my lodging. There I barred the door,
pressed his breast to mine in repeated embraces, and with
my cheek rubbed his face which was suffused with tears. It
was some time before either of us could find words, for the
boy too was speechless, his lovable breast heaving with con-
tinual sobs. 'This is not as it should be,' I said. 'Though you
deserted me, I still love you, and though the wound was
deep, no scar remains on my heart. What excuse have you
for having yielded to an outsider's love? Did I merit this
injustice?' Once he realized that he retained my affection,
he raised his gaze . . .
'I entrusted the judgement on my love to no arbiter but
you. But I am no longer complaining, no longer harking
back, if you are really and truly sorry.' As I poured out these
words amidst groans and tears, he wiped his face with his
cloak, and said: 'Now, Encolpius, I ask you honestly to cast

-79-

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