Index and Glossary of Names
(Numbers refer to sections of the text.)
Achilles, hero of the Iliad, Introd. V; 59; 129
Actium, scene of Octavian's victory over Antony and Cleopatra ( 31 BC), 121 l. 142
Addison, Joseph, Introd. VIII, IX
Aeneas, Introd. V
Aetna, Mt., volcanic mountain in Sicily, 122 l. 165
Africa, 48; 102; 117; 119 ll. 15, 30; 125; 141
Agamemnon: teacher of rhetoric, Introd. V; 2; 6; 26; at Trimalchio's, 28; 46; 48 f.; 52; 65; 69; 78
Agamemnon in Homer, Introd. v; 59
Agatho, friend of Trimalchio, 74
Ajax, Greek hero maddened at Troy when worsted in contest for the arms of Achilles, 59
Albucia, libidinous lady, Introd. n. 7; fr. 6
Alcibiades, Athenian who tried to seduce Socrates, 128
Alemán's Guzmán, Spanish picaresque story, Introd. n. 51
Alexandrian slaves, 31; 68
Alps, 122 ll. 176, 197
Amadis the Gaul, burlesqued by Cervantes, Introd. IV
Ammon, Egyptian god worshipped in Africa, 119 l. 15
Amphitryon, mortal father of Hercules, 123 l. 250
Anacreon, sixth-century lyric poet of Teos, fr. 20
Apelles, painter at the Macedonian court, 83; 88
Apelles, tragic actor, 64
Apennines, 124 l. 343
Apollo, 83; 89; 121 l. 142
Apulia, district of south-east Italy, 77
Arabs, 102; 119 l. 12
Aratus, celebrated poet-astronomer at Athens and later at courts of Macedon and Syria, 40
Arbiter, sobriquet of Petronius, Introd. 1
Archer, sign of the Zodiac, 35; 39
Argos, 139
Ariadne, rescuer of Theseus from the Cretan labyrinth, 138
Aristotle, Introd. VI
Arrowsmith, William, Introd. IX
Ascyltus: meaning of name, Introd. II; rival of Encolpius for Giton's affections, Introd. II, V; 6; 9 ff.; 19 ff.; at Trimalchio's, 57 ff.; 72; makes off with Giton, 79 f.; at the baths, 92; searches for Giton, 97 f.; see also133
Asia: source of turgid oratory, 2; home of Ganymede, 44; visited by Eumolpus, 85
Atellane farces, crude Italian entertainments, 53
Atellane verses, 68
Athena, 58
Athens: receptive of Asian oratory, 2; bees from, 38
Athos, Mt., fr. 27
Attic honey, 38
Augustus, emperor: and Trimalchio, Introd. VI; drinking health to, 60
Babylon, 55
Bacchus: impersonated by slave of

-205-

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The Satyricon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Satyricon i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Select Bibliography xlvi
  • 1 - At the School of Rhetoric 1
  • 2 - Dubious Encounters in the Town 5
  • 3 - Jealousy at the Lodging 7
  • 4 - An Episode in the Market 9
  • 5 - Enter Quartilla, the Priapic Priestess 12
  • 6 - Dinner at Trimalchio's 20
  • 7 - Giton Spurns Encolpius for Ascyltus 67
  • 8 - Eumolpus in the Art Gallery 71
  • 9 - Reconciliation with Giton; Eumolpus as Rival 79
  • 10 - The Episode on Ship. Enter Lichas and Tryphaena 88
  • 11 - The Journey to Croton 110
  • 12 - The Encounter with Circe 124
  • 13 - Eumolpus and the Legacy-Hunters 145
  • Index and Glossary of Names 205
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