The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

I FEAR that Mr Sherlock Holmes may become like one of those popular tenors who, having outlived their time, are still tempted to make repeated farewell bows to their indulgent audiences. This must cease and he must go the way of all flesh, material or imaginary. One likes to think that there is some fantastic limbo for the children of imagination, some strange, impossible place where the beaux of Fielding may still make love to the belles of Richardson, where Scott's heroes still may strut, Dickens's delightful Cockneys still raise a laugh, and Thackeray's worldlings continue to carry on their reprehensible careers. Perhaps in some humble corner of such a Valhalla, Sherlock and his Watson may for a time find a place, while some more astute sleuth with some even less astute comrade may fill the stage which they have vacated.

His career has been a long one--though it is possible to exaggerate it; decrepit gentlemen who approach me and declare that his adventures formed the reading of their boyhood do not meet the response from me which they seem to expect. One is not anxious to have one's personal dates handled so unkindly. As a matter of cold fact Holmes made his début in A Study in Scarlet and in The Sign of Four, two small booklets which appeared between 1887 and 1889 [ 1890]. It was in 1891 that 'A Scandal in Bohemia', the first of the long series of short stories, appeared in The Strand Magazine. The public seemed appreciative and desirous of more, so that from that date, thirty-six years ago, they have been produced in a broken series which now contains no fewer than fifty-six stories, republished in The Adventures, The Memoirs, The Return, and His Last Bow, and there remain these twelve published during the last few years which are here produced under the title of The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes. He began his adventures in the very heart of the later Victorian era, carried it through the all-too-short reign

C.S.H. - 3

-3-

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The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxii
  • Select Bibliography xxxiii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xxxix
  • Preface 3
  • The Mazarin Stone 5
  • Thor Bridge 23
  • The Creeping Man 50
  • The Sussex Vampire 72
  • The Three Garridebs 89
  • The Illustrious Client 106
  • The Three Gables 133
  • The Blanched Soldier 151
  • The Lion's Mane 172
  • The Retired Colourman 192
  • The Veiled Lodger 208
  • Shoscombe Old Place 220
  • Explanatory Notes 238
  • Appendix - A Source for 'the Veiled Lodger' the Love-Ly Tam-Er, the Cru-El Li-Ons, and the Clev-Er Clown A Tale for the Lit-Tle Ones 290
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