The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

Thor Bridge

SOMEWHERE in the vaults of the bank of Cox and Co.,* at Charing Cross,* there is a travel-worn and battered tin dispatch-box with my name, John H. Watson; MD, Late Indian Army,* painted upon the lid. It is crammed with papers, nearly all of which are records of cases to illustrate the curious problems which Mr Sherlock Holmes had at various times to examine. Some, and not the least interesting, were complete failures, and as such will hardly bear narrating, since no final explanation is forthcoming. A problem without a solution may interest the student, but can hardly fail to annoy the casual reader. Among these unfinished tales is that of Mr James Phillimore,* who, stepping back into his own house to get his umbrella, was never more seen in this world. No less remarkable is that of the cutter Alicia* which sailed one spring morning into a small patch of mist from where she never again emerged, nor was anything further ever heard of herself and her crew. A third case worthy of note is that of Isadora Persano,* the wellknown journalist and duellist, who was found stark staring mad with a matchbox in front of him which contained a remarkable worm, said to be unknown to science. Apart from these unfathomed cases,* there are some which involve the secrets of private families to an extent which would mean consternation in many exalted quarters if it were thought possible that they might find their way into print. I need not say that such a breach of confidence is unthinkable, and that these records will be separated and destroyed now that my friend has time to turn his energies to the matter. There remain a considerable residue of cases of greater or less interest which I might have edited before had I not feared to give the public a surfeit which might react upon the reputation of the man whom above all others I revere. In some I was myself concerned and can speak as an

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The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxii
  • Select Bibliography xxxiii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xxxix
  • Preface 3
  • The Mazarin Stone 5
  • Thor Bridge 23
  • The Creeping Man 50
  • The Sussex Vampire 72
  • The Three Garridebs 89
  • The Illustrious Client 106
  • The Three Gables 133
  • The Blanched Soldier 151
  • The Lion's Mane 172
  • The Retired Colourman 192
  • The Veiled Lodger 208
  • Shoscombe Old Place 220
  • Explanatory Notes 238
  • Appendix - A Source for 'the Veiled Lodger' the Love-Ly Tam-Er, the Cru-El Li-Ons, and the Clev-Er Clown A Tale for the Lit-Tle Ones 290
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