The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

The Three Garridebs

IT may have been a comedy, or it may have been a tragedy. It cost one man his reason, it cost me a bloodletting, and it cost yet another man the penalties of the law. Yet there was certainly an element of comedy. Well, you shall judge for yourselves.

I remember the date very well, for it was in the same month that Holmes refused a knighthood* for services which may perhaps some day be described. I only refer to the matter in passing, for in my position of partner and confidant I am obliged to be particularly careful to avoid any indiscretion. I repeat, however, that this enables me to fix the date, which was the latter end of June, 1902, shortly after the conclusion of the South African War. Holmes had spent several days in bed, as was his habit from time to time, but he emerged that morning with a long foolscap document in his hand and a twinkle of amusement in his austere grey eyes.

'There is a chance for you to make some money, friend Watson,' said he. 'Have you ever heard the name of Garrideb?'

I admitted that I had not.

'Well, if you can lay your hands upon a Garrideb, there's money in it.'

'Why?'

'Ah, that's a long story--rather a whimsical one, too. I don't think in all our explorations of human complexities we have ever come upon anything more singular. The fellow will be here presently for cross-examination, so I won't open the matter up till he comes. But meanwhile, that's the name we want.'

The telephone directory* lay on the table beside me, and I turned over the pages in a rather hopeless quest. But to my amazement there was this strange name in its due place. I gave a cry of triumph.

-89-

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The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxii
  • Select Bibliography xxxiii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xxxix
  • Preface 3
  • The Mazarin Stone 5
  • Thor Bridge 23
  • The Creeping Man 50
  • The Sussex Vampire 72
  • The Three Garridebs 89
  • The Illustrious Client 106
  • The Three Gables 133
  • The Blanched Soldier 151
  • The Lion's Mane 172
  • The Retired Colourman 192
  • The Veiled Lodger 208
  • Shoscombe Old Place 220
  • Explanatory Notes 238
  • Appendix - A Source for 'the Veiled Lodger' the Love-Ly Tam-Er, the Cru-El Li-Ons, and the Clev-Er Clown A Tale for the Lit-Tle Ones 290
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