Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology

By Roger Lonsdale | Go to book overview
CONTENTS
Introductionxxi
MARY, LADY CHUDLEIGH (née LEE) (1656-1710)1
1. from The Ladies Defence2
2. To the Ladies3
3 The Resolve4
ANNE FINCH (née KINGSMILL), COUNTESS OF, WINCHILSEA (1661-1720)4
4. from The Spleen. A Pindaric Poem6
5. A Sigh8
6. Life's Progress8
7. A Pastoral Dialogue between Two Shepherdesses9
8. Adam Posed
9. A Tale of the Miser and the Poet12
10. from The Petition for an Absolute Retreat15
11. The Hog, the Sheep and Goat, Carrying to a Fair18
12. Enquiry after Peace. A Fragment19
13. To the Nightingale20
14. Reformation21
15. Friendship between Ephelia and Ardelia22
16. A Noctumal Reverie22
17. A Ballad to Mrs Catherine Fleming in London23
18. A Song on the South Sea26
SARAH EGERTON (née FYGE, later FIELD) (1670-1723)26
19. The Repulse to Alcander27
20. To Philaster29
21. To One who said I must not Love29
22. To Marina30
23 The Emulation31
ELIZABETH THOMAS (1675-1731)32
24. Epistle to Clemena. Occasioned by an Argument34
25. The Execration36
26. The True Effigies of a Certain Squire37
27. A New Litany, Occasioned by an Invitation to a Wedding39
28. On Sir J ----- S ----- saying in a Sarcastic Manner, My Books would make me Mad. An Ode40
29. from Jill, A Pindaric Ode42
30. To Almystrea, on her Divine Works43

-vii-

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Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eighteenth-Century Women Poets i
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Mary, Lady Chudleigh (née Lee) (1656-1710) 1
  • Sources and Notes 515
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 541
  • Index of Authors 554
  • Index of Selected Topics 556
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