Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology

By Roger Lonsdale | Go to book overview

INDEX OF TITLES AND FIRST LINES

References are to the numbers of the poems

A chimney-sweeper's boy am I;poem no 298
A female mind like a rude fallow lies; 102
A gentleman, most wretched in his lot, 14
A Quaker's stiffness, with a tradesman's grin; 162
A scholar first my love implored, 172
A wit, transported with enditing, 9
A youth there was possessed of every charm, 77
Accept, much honoured shade! the artless lays 110
Adam Posed 8
Address to a Bachelor on a Delicate Occassion 180
Address to her Husband 79
Address to the Muses, An 282
Addressed to -- 47
Addressed to a Beech Tree 174
Adieu, dear name which birth and nature gave -- 246
Advice to a Young Lady lately married 154
Advice to Sophronia 136
Ah! why from me art thou for ever flown? 249
Airy spirits, you who love 216
Alas, my Purse! how lean and low! 108
'All-bounteous Heaven,' Castalio cries, 85
Amazed we read of Nature's early throes, 134
An' so it seems it is reported 287
And auld Robin Forbes hes gien tem a dance, 190
'And ye shall walk in silk attire, 188
Answer to a Love-Letter in Verse, An 44
Art of Coquetry, The 150
As Lob among his cows one day 273
As once grave Pluto drove his royal wheels 132
Ask me no more, my truth to prove, 72
At an open window sitting 317
At length, by so much importunity pressed, 42
At length my soul the fatal union finds, 37
At the brow of a hill a fair shepherdess dwelt, 106
Auld Robin Forbes 190
Auld Robin Gray 182
Aurelia, when your zeal makes known 129
Ballad to Mrs Catherine Fleming in London, A 17
Bas Bleu: Or, Conversation, The 218
Be still, sweet babe, no harm shall reach thee, 309
Behind moth-eaten curtain, 'stead of press, 75
Beneath my feet when Flora cast 73
Beside a spreading elm, from whose high boughs 281
Bid the fond mother spill her infant's blood, 21
Birth-Day, The 306

-541-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 556

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.