A Survey of Polish Literature and Culture

By Manfred Kridl; Olga Scherer-Virski | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
YOUNG POLAND

Toward the end of the nineteenth century, political conditions in Poland were approximately the same as those which prevailed after the Insurrection of 1863. Social and cultural life developed along the lines described in the preceding chapter; at times we even anticipated the chronology a little in order to maintain the continuity of the picture. However, the last decade of the nineteenth century and the first fifteen years of the twentieth (it is impossible to establish the dates more exactly) mark a distinct turn in Polish intellectual life. This turn is in part a continuation of some tendencies existing during the positivist epoch, but it is also an attempt to create a new world view, inimical to positivism, and, in literature, a new esthetics, opposed to realism. Among the new tendencies, which had already begun in the preceding period, one must recall the appearance of strong, political mass organizations, such as the P.P.S. and the Peasant Party, which, acknowledging the idea of 'organic' work, proclaimed political struggle against both the oppressors and native reaction as their principal task. And political struggle, as we know, was not in the spirit of the strict positivist program. The social policy of these two parties also went further than the progressive liberalism of the positivists; the socialists demanded a fundamental transformation of the polity, while the agrarians subordinated all social issues to the interests of the peasant class. Some distinguished positivists of high intellectual and moral culture rose above the spirit of the epoch; the most outstanding example is Prus. Sienkiewicz's work did not fit at all into the framework of the positivist world view or its literary program, while that of Asnyk and Konopnicka also revealed many elements contrary to the 'official' trends of the epoch.

This tendency to react against the positivist mentality, both in politics and in literature, gained in strength and influence during the new generation, and found support in the similar reaction which had taken

-403-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Survey of Polish Literature and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 525

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.