Trial Balance: The Education of An American

By Alan Valentine | Go to book overview

V
Exploration

ONE'S impressions of any country are partly reflections of one's own emotions there. England would always represent to Angus the happiness of purposeful endeavor. That is real happiness, perhaps the most dependable men ever find, but to Angus it was a familiar one raised to new peaks of challenge and satisfaction. England also gave him masculine friendships, permanent because based on common values, and it gave him a sense of security in the solid and unequivocal permanence of the English spirit. Endeavor, friendship, and security are good emotions but elementary ones, and though Angus did not know it, maturity demanded something more.

The Continent offered him expansion of spirit, and Angus got there all of it his personal limitations would allow. The process gave him happiness of a more illuminating kind: like a blind man whose eyes by some miracle discern suddenly a new world of color and variety under dazzling sunlight, Angus discovered beauty and the freedom of emotional release.

Some of this was not due to the Continent as it was, but to the Continent as mirrored in Angus' eyes. While Oxford and England

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Trial Balance: The Education of An American
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Part 1 - Education By Plan 13
  • I - Tribal Origins 15
  • II - Initiations 34
  • III - The Pursuit of Praise 49
  • IV - Puritan's Progress 75
  • V - Exploration 100
  • VI - The Academic Mind 121
  • VII - Men of Science 144
  • Part 2 - Education By Accident 161
  • VIII - Dollar Diplomacy 163
  • IX - The Oriental Mind 183
  • X - Political Economics 202
  • XI - The Political Mind 218
  • XII - The Social Animal 239
  • XIII - Unity and Diversity 259
  • XIV - Angus Emeritus 280
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.