Rebuilding St. Paul's after the Great Fire of London

By Jane Lang | Go to book overview

REBUILDING ST. PAUL'S after the Great Fire of London

by JANE LANG

'Lord, remember David and all his trouble; How he sware unto the Lord and vowed a vow unto the Almighty God of Jacob; I will not come within the tabernacle of mine house, nor climb up into my bed; I will not suffer mine eyes to sleep, nor mine eyelids to slumber, neither the temples of my head to take any rest; Until I find out a place for the temple of the Lord, an habitation for the mighty God of Jacob.' Psalm 132 (Prayer Book version).

GEOFFREY CUMBERLEGE OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS LONDON NEW YORK TORONTO 1956

-iii-

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Rebuilding St. Paul's after the Great Fire of London
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Prologue 1
  • Part One - The Problem of the Design 19
  • Chapter I - Ruins 21
  • Chapter II - 'Handsome and Noble, and Suitable' 35
  • Chapter III - The Prospect Enlarged 47
  • Chapter IV - Spectre of Old Paul's 64
  • Part Two - The Phoenix Rises 77
  • Chapter I - Workmen and Officials 79
  • Chapter II - Finance and Friends 91
  • Chapter III - Stone 103
  • Chapter IV - The Cathedral Begins Take Shape 117
  • Chapter V - Storm -- and Aftermath 133
  • Chapter VI - The Drive to Roof the Choir 147
  • Chapter VII - Fittings 160
  • Chapter VIII - 'I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me. . .' 179
  • Part Three - 'A Perfect, Glorious Pile' 191
  • Chapter I - Discouragement 193
  • Chapter II - Sir Christopher Recovers Confidence 206
  • Chapter III - St. Paul's Receives Queen Anne 221
  • Chapter IV - The Last Stone on the Lantern 231
  • Epilogue 245
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 263
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