Animal Cognition: Proceedings of the Harry Frank Guggenheim Conference, June 2-4, 1982

By H. L. Roitblat; T. G. Bever et al. | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

With this volume we initiate a series of books in comparative cognition and neuroscience. The presentations at the Harry Frank Guggenheim Conference, out of which the present volume grew, showed that this field of enquiry into cognitive functioning and its neural basis had reached maturity. That conference also crystallized the needs that the series is intended to meet.

The primary function of the series is to provide an outlet for further discussion and development of the field of comparative cognition and neuroscience. It is also a recognition of the need for and value of transdisciplinary dialogues about cognitive processes, neurophysiological mechanisms underlying those processes, and the evolutionary and ethological factors that shape them. The series' editorial board speaks to our commitment to that dialogue.

In view of the fact that the price of academic books has become a major hindrance to academic communication, the regular editions of all books published in this series will be accompanied by the publication of low-priced "student editions." Further, we are committed, whenever possible, to use computers to facilitate the publishing process. The price of the present volume is indicative of the initial effects of both of these two measures. We hope in these ways to return academic publishing to the service of academics.

We are proud to be able to include the present volume in the series even though it was substantially completed prior to the inception of the series. We are particularly grateful for the important contribution of Herbert Terrace in the organization of this conference and the production of this volume.

T. G. Bever

D. S. Olton

H. L. Roitblat

Editorial board:

Werner K. Honig Klaus Immelman Herbert M. Jenkins Stephen Kosslyn Larry R. Squire Richard F. Thompson Allan Wagner

-ii-

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