Linguistic Structure and Change: An Explanation from Language Processing

By Thomas N. Berg | Go to book overview

4
Language Structure

The main body of this monograph is organized as follows. The first part is about language structure (Chapter 4), the second about language change (Chapter 5), and the third about poetic language (Chapter 6). Qualitatively and quantitatively, the first and second parts are much more important than the third. Its main function is to illustrate the diversity of domains for which relevant hypotheses may be developed. The logic of the argument is quite similar across the individual sections. A review of psycholinguistic evidence serves as the background against which pertinent predictions as to language structure are derived. These predictions are subsequently put to the test and evaluated. This procedure will be adopted irrespective of whether the linguistic data are taken from the relevant literature or presented for the first time. The logic of the argumentation is reflected in the somewhat unconventional structure of the individual sections: psycholinguistic evidence → predictions as to language structure → test and evaluation. My major objective is to assess the value of the processing approach, not the value of more linguistically oriented approaches. This precludes an exhaustive review of the linguistic literature on each topic. Alternative accounts are only considered when they are immediately relevant to the issue at hand, in particular when they can be directly contrasted with the approach advocated here. Unless stated otherwise, the hypotheses advanced below should not be taken automatically to invalidate other claims made in the literature. Rather, they should be construed as additive in two respects. Because of the multiple causation of linguistic phenomena, one explanation does not rule out another, as mentioned. The approach taken here may also provide a deeper understanding of well-known linguistic phenomena by showing how the empirical data follow naturally from a particular conception of language, and how the extant theoretical claims may benefit from being placed in a wider perspective.

The division of this monograph into a synchronic part and a diachronic part is mainly for expository reasons, although this distinction is not clear-cut. Actually, there is some degree of parallelness in the topics that are treated in the diachronic and synchronic sections. The treatment of certain basic issues did not always justify separate synchronic and diachronic sections, as in the case of the first section, to which we now turn.

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Linguistic Structure and Change: An Explanation from Language Processing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Abbreviations xii
  • 1 - On the 'Art' of Explanation 1
  • 2 - Explanation from a Macrolinguistic Perspective 18
  • 3 - Method 56
  • 4 - Language Structure 68
  • 5 - Language Change 165
  • 6 - Poetic Language 259
  • 7 - Discussion 278
  • 8 - A Psycholinguistic Model of Language Structure and Change 282
  • 9 - Implications for Psycholinguistic Theory 300
  • 10 - The Overall Perspective: Reductionist or Non-Reductionist? 302
  • References 314
  • Index 333
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.