The United States and the Far East: Background Papers Prepared for the Use of Participants and the Final Report of the Tenth American Assembly, Arden House, Harriman Campus of Columbia University, Harriman, New York, November 15-18, 1956

By American Assembly - Graduate School of Business Columbia University | Go to book overview

Conclusion
The broader perspective

by Willard L. Thorp

There is something a little unrealistic and unfinished about reviewing foreign policy country by country. National boundary lines are not absolute, and each of the previous chapters has pointed out problems which must be considered in the light of their implications or even their direct significance to countries other than themselves or the United States. Nevertheless, the greater part of foreign policy operation is bilateral in character. Even though the purpose may be much broader in its scope, the implementation of a broad objective often requires a careful construction country by country.

In a very real sense, foreign policy must start with our attitude toward the country concerned. Our policy can be negative and obstructive; or we can refuse to become involved; or we can seek out forms of cooperative endeavor toward constructive ends. As to one of the countries discussed in the background papers, there is very little of substance that we do with respect to Communist China, though our policy clearly falls in the first category. Our contacts are very slight, and, in fact, we do not formally recognize its existence as a nation.

But with respect to the other three countries, Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, the problem is rather one of how much we wish to become involved. In each of these cases, there are many possibilities for

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The United States and the Far East: Background Papers Prepared for the Use of Participants and the Final Report of the Tenth American Assembly, Arden House, Harriman Campus of Columbia University, Harriman, New York, November 15-18, 1956
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