Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal

By Robert P. Ingalls | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

BY GEORGE MEANY

Herbert H. Lehman was the ideal public servant. No other man I ever met, or ever heard of, was more worthy of that title.

He had none of the average politician's guile, the average diplomat's evasiveness, the average banker's greed or the average statesman's aloofness.

He was a quiet man, completely honest, filled with compassion for others, truly dedicated to the democratic process and determined to make it work for the public good.

As Governor, Herbert Lehman was a trail-blazer. He sought and found new ways to serve the people of New York, and the record of social welfare legislation passed during his administration is unsurpassed. As a United States Senator, he was the conscience of the Congress. In both positions, he served with absolute integrity and rare distinction.

Throughout his public life, he put the problems of people--all people everywhere--above all else. He understood their needs, shared their aspirations, helped them achieve their goals.

To him, there were no national boundaries that, by right, denied some the freedom others enjoyed. He insisted that freedom and liberty, political and economic self-determination must never tolerate artificial barriers of race, creed, color, sex or geography.

To him, freedom was the God-given right of all people and he was, therefore, the unrelenting, implacable foe of dictators or would-be dictators.

It was a rare privilege for me to have known and worked with Herbert Lehman. It was a great and lasting honor to have been his friend.

To all who contemplate a life of public service, I recommend adopting Herbert H. Lehman as the model. There has never been--and I fear may never again be--his equal.

-vii-

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Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xix
  • I- from Wall Street to State Street 1
  • Notes 24
  • II- Emergency Unemployment Relief 31
  • Notes 42
  • III- From Emergency Relief to the Welfare State 48
  • Notes 66
  • IV- The Search for Security 71
  • Notes 94
  • V- Defending the Defenseless 102
  • Notes 123
  • VI- Lending Labor a Hand 131
  • VII- The Promise of Parity 148
  • Notes 172
  • VIII- The Advent of Public Housing 182
  • IX- Battling the Utilities 210
  • Notes 226
  • X- The End of an Era 231
  • Notes 244
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
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