Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal

By Robert P. Ingalls | Go to book overview

I
FROM WALL STREET TO STATE STREET

At about two o'clock In the morning of October 2, 1928, the call went through to Franklin D. Roosevelt in Warm Springs, Georgia. After numerous rebuffs, Democratic party leaders at the state convention in Rochester were trying once more to convince the unwilling Roosevelt to accept the nomination for governor. Alfred E. Smith, anxious to bolster his presidential bid with the strongest possible ticket in New York, begged FDR to run. When Roosevelt still demurred, in part because of his commitments to the Warm Springs Foundation, the Democratic national chairman, John J. Raskob, got on the line to say that he would take care of any financial obligations connected with the spa. Aware of Roosevelt's desire to continue receiving treatments for his paralysis caused by polio, Smith minimized the burden of the governor's job and suggested Herbert H. Lehman, a New York banker, as a possible lieutenant governor who could spell Roosevelt during his visits to Warm Springs. After Lehman himself took the phone and affirmed his readiness to run, Roosevelt finally relented and agreed to accept the nomination. Several hours later, joyful delegates formally endorsed the Roosevelt-Lehman ticket. 1

The outcome of the state convention surprised Lehman as much as Roosevelt. Lehman had gone to Rochester devoted to the interests of Al Smith, whose national campaign he served as finance director. Although his name had been mentioned for the top spot on the state ticket after Republicans had nominated a Jew for governor, Lehman had discouraged any talk of his candidacy, because he did not like religion dictating the choice and he thought he had little chance in any case. Completely unaware that Rochester would mark a turning, point in his life, Lehman had not even brought his closest confidant, his wife, Edith. 2

With rising doubts about Al Smith's chances of winning the presidency, Herbert Lehman wanted the 1928 election to ensure at least a worthy successor for the Happy Warrior in Albany. Lehman later recalled: "I was so anxious to see the state remain under a liberal Democrat, which I knew Roosevelt to be, that I think I probably would have done almost anything that he asked me to do." When FDR finally agreed to serve if

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xix
  • I- from Wall Street to State Street 1
  • Notes 24
  • II- Emergency Unemployment Relief 31
  • Notes 42
  • III- From Emergency Relief to the Welfare State 48
  • Notes 66
  • IV- The Search for Security 71
  • Notes 94
  • V- Defending the Defenseless 102
  • Notes 123
  • VI- Lending Labor a Hand 131
  • VII- The Promise of Parity 148
  • Notes 172
  • VIII- The Advent of Public Housing 182
  • IX- Battling the Utilities 210
  • Notes 226
  • X- The End of an Era 231
  • Notes 244
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.