Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal

By Robert P. Ingalls | Go to book overview
Save to active project

electricity rates. Not the least of these barriers was a state fiscal policy that increased taxes on utilities which, in turn, could pass along to consumers any rise in costs.

Above all, advocates of cheaper electricity could not match the political power of private utility corporations. Lehman himself took an advanced position on every question involved in the regulation of utilities, but he could not even line up all members of his own party behind measures requested by the PSC. Furthermore, there was no well-organized pressure group outside the legislature to back up Lehman on this issue. Letters of protest from consumers scarcely compared with the influence exerted by utility monopolies, which maintained full-time lobbyists in Albany. State officials, notably Lehman and members of the PSC and the Power Authority, carried the burden of the fight for improved regulation and public power, and they were outgunned by utility interests in Albany and Washington. Although reformers won a few battles during the decade, the state's privately owned utilities triumphed in the war against effective regulation and public power.


NOTES
1.
New York originally established two commissions--one for New York City and another for the rest of the state--but in 1921, the two were combined into one unit headed by five commissioners.
2.
Martin G. Glaeser, Public Utilities in American Capitalism ( New York, 1957), p. 249.
3.
A third holding company, the Associated Gas and Electric Company, accounted for less than 10 percent of the state's electrical energy.
4.
Summary Report of the Federal Trade Commission to the Senate of the United States, Pursuant to Senate Resolution No. 83, 70th Congress, 1st Session, on Economic, Financial, and Corporate Phases of Holding and Operating Companies of Electric and Gas Utilities ( Washington, 1935), pp., 84, 96-114, 734-38; James C. Bonbright and Gardiner C. Means, The Holding Company: Its Public Significance and Its Regulation ( New York, 1932), pp. 90-148.
5.
Quoted in Stephen Raushenbush, The Power Fight ( New York, 1932), p. 16.
6.
Quoted in Jack Levin, Power Ethics ( New York, 1931), p. 73.
7.
Quoted in Raushenbush, The Power Fight, p. 38.
8.
Levin, Power Ethics, pp. 129, 167. Quotation on p. 167.
10.
Summary Report of the Federal Trade Commission to the Senate of the United States, Pursuant to Senate Resolution No. 83, 70th Congress, 1st Session, on Efforts by Associations and Agencies of Electric and Gas Utilities to Influence Public Opinion ( Washington, 1934), p. 18.
11.
William E. Mosher to Morris L. Cooke, June 12, 1930, Box 94, Morris L. Cooke Papers, FDRL.
12.
Morris L. Cooke to William E. Mosher, February 6, 14, 1930, Mosher to Cooke, February 11, 1930, Cooke Papers; New York State, Annual Report of the Public Service Commission for the Year 1939 ( Albany, 1940), pp. 217-19. (Hereinafter referred to as Annual Report of the PSC)
13.
Bernard Bellush, Franklin D. Roosevelt as Governor of New York ( New York, 1955), pp. 243-68.
14.
Quoted in Raushenbush, The Power Fight, pp. 118-19.

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?